Author Archives: leeinroyston

The books by my bed

When I started writing this blog post some weeks ago, little did I think I’d have the time to do some serious reading! What follows is largely what I wrote then. The main difference is that I now plan to write short reviews of the books by my bed to share over the coming weeks while we’re all staying at home. 

What are the books?

As regular readers of my blog posts will know, I’m a lover of real books and enjoy reading almost as much as writing. My  reading is largely Influenced by author reputations; based on previous books I’ve read by them, and recommendations from other book lovers that I respect. There are currently 14 unread books by my bed – in alphabetical order by title…

The books – the baker’s dozen

Broken Vows; Tony Blair – The Tragedy of Power The unofficial biography of Tony Blair. Bought for 99p in a book sale and, given its size, it doubles as a doorstop from time to time when the bedroom window is open. https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Tom-Bower/Broken-Vows–Tony-Blair-The-Tragedy-of-Power/19673554

Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us I like popular psychology books and a positive review by Malcolm Gladwell (one of my must-read authors) prompted me to order this probably a year ago. I’ve got to page 61. https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Daniel-H-Pink/Drive–The-Surprising-Truth-About-What-Motivates-Us/21901101

Duane’s Depressed given/lent (can’t remember) to me by brother-in-law (author of Nobody of any importance – see below) a fan of Larry McMurtry, who also wrote The Last Picture Show and Texasville, and other American authors. I see I made it to page 116 first time around… https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/54816.Duane_s_Depressed

How to be alive: A guide to the kind of happiness that helps the world Already people are talking about how our world might (or might not) be changed forever when the Coronavirus pandemic is over. This book is apposite in that context. I bought it, got to page 184, then my daughter borrowed it to read (she’d read the author’s previous book No Impact Man) But that was a while ago, so I think I’ll have to start again!  https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Colin-Beavan/How-to-Be-Alive–A-Guide-to-the-Kind-of-Happiness-That-Helps-the-World/19419158

Nobody of any importance This book is written by my brother-in-law and is his late father’s recollections (written and verbal) of frontline action in World War One. It’s a great work of love and dedication – self-published and sold in aid of the British Red Cross.  http://www.footsoldiersam.co.uk

One Hundred Years of Solitude This book gets my award for ‘most-appropriately-titled-Coronavirus-reading’ (alongside Love in the Time of Cholera by the same author). A gratefully received recent gift which, given my past life in publishing on Latin American affairs, is wholly appropriate. A book I’ve been meaning to read for many years (but not 100). https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Gabriel-Garcia-Marquez/One-Hundred-Years-of-Solitude/15437723

Rethink: The surprising history of new ideas Author Steven Poole writes on ideas, culture, language and society. I share his love of words and I’m interested in creativity, so that was the attraction when I bought the book (a couple of years ago…) https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Steven-Poole/Rethink–The-Surprising-History-of-New-Ideas/20530224

The Last Landlady This was an impulse buy, except it wasn’t; I paid for the book but didn’t receive if for another 18 months or so. You see, publication was crowd-funded and the campaign must have come to attention at the right time. As a book and pub lover it was particularly appealing so I happily paid over the odds. The book is described as a memoir of the author’s grandmother – a landlady – and a social history of pub life.   https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Laura-Thompson/The-Last-Landlady–An-English-Memoir/23910248

The Sentence is Death Crime writing at its best says the publicity, but I already know that Anthony Horowitz is a versatile and talented writer so I believe the blurb. I’ve particularly enjoyed his new Sherlock Holmes novels, and I expect this second title in his Daniel Hawthorne private investigator series will be equally entertaining.  https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Anthony-Horowitz/The-Sentence-is-Death–A-mind-bending-murder-mystery-from/23639303

The Snowman Author Jo Nesbo has millions of fans worldwide and my brother-in-law (another one) is one of them. I was given this book as alternative holiday reading (I usually take the latest Lee Child or John Grisham blockbuster). My bookmark tells me I made it to page 17 when I last picked up the book last summer. https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Jo-Nesbo/The-Snowman–Harry-Hole-7/16453092

Tickbox Written by David Boyle who I’m admired for many years as a thinker (and writer) and known through our shared involvement in Timebanking when it was new to the UK. He writes on diverse subjects – I think he’s essentially an economist (he’s a Fellow of the New Economics Foundation) and has written the wonderful Little Money Book, but I also enjoyed his book Authenticity: Brands, Fakes, Spin and the Lust for Real Life more than 15 years ago. https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/David-Boyle/Tickbox/24240617

Top Five Regrets of the Dying Strangely uplifting given the subject matter (and the current Coronavirus crisis) this book started life as a blog and grew into a journal of the Australian author’s own life and learning as a professional end-of-life carer and house-sitter. https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Bronnie-Ware/Top-Five-Regrets-of-the-Dying–A-Life-Transformed-by-the-Dearly-Departing/23828296

Upstream: How to solve problems before they happen A new offering from one half of a writing team of two brothers (Dan and Chip Heath) who author intriguing popular psychology type books. I can recommend Made to Stick: Why some ideas survive and others die and The Power of Moments: Why certain experiences have extraordinary impact. https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Dan-Heath/Upstream–How-to-solve-problems-before-they-happen/24555849

The 14th book in the photo (spine to the wall) will be my last read – if necessary – when I’ll reveal what it is, if I do read it.

Why do they remain unread?

Despite 4-day weekends, I can’t find/ don’t make enough time for reading for pleasure. Luckily, I don’t have any problem getting to sleep at night or staying asleep, so no reading in the wee small hours. You’ll notice I’ve started quite a few of them, so maybe that says something about my inability to stick with reading books a bit at a time – I need a long run-up like when I’m on holiday. I’m also a slow reader.  The magazine you see on top of the pile of books – Private Eye – is another reason I don’t get through books; I’m too busy reading that (I’ve been a subscriber for decades).

Another reason I have so many unread books is… shameless plug; I can’t resist the ease of ordering online through Hive Books (often cheaper than you-know-who and they support local independent bookshops https://www.hive.co.uk). Even when I’ve bought a book but not (yet) read it I don’t feel it’s a waste of money. For now my plan is to read the books by my bed, before adding to the pile.

Once the books are read, some will stay in our house (‘too many’ says my wife) , others will find their way to my little library (outside https://www.facebook.com/MillRoadLittleLibrary) and/or charity shops, or will be given as gifts to friends (Man Walks into a Pub https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Pete-Brown/Man-Walks-Into-A-Pub–A-Sociable-History-of-Beer-Fully-Up/783549 being a recent example)

Do share details about your own bedside reading – ideally with a short review!

Related blog post:                              https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2018/07/09/my-love-affair-with-books 

 

What’s the going rate?

What the going rate for mending a toilet flush? What would you expect to pay someone to make and fit a solid wooden outside gate? An impossible question to answer without further information – the spec for the job – even for a trained plumber and carpenter.

I know that the price for a product or service is about supply and demand, and it may vary even from the same provider. You’d  expect to pay more for an ice cream on the beach in the middle of summer than in a city centre in the middle of winter; and similarly with cinema seats. Then there’s the cost of the materials, the time it takes to do the job, and the quality of the work (I wonder – do more skilled workers take more or less time to do a job?)

Before we go out to get an estimate for a job – from someone like a plumber, a carpenter, or an electrician – we’re unlikely to have even a ballpark figure at the start of the process. We need to do some research – find out if anyone has had a similar job done locally, get a number of actual quotes and compare them.

In an emergency you have less scope to ‘shop around’ and the providers know this – a burst pipe needs fixing quick and you’re prepared to pay almost anything to stop further damage. I understand why the hourly rate of a service provider can look high (apart from you paying for their expertise) – it has to cover the down time, and all the business costs – including time spent on travel and the administration when they’re not out actually earning money.

I was talking about my plumbing problem (no, not that kind of plumbing) with a friend who thought that insurance companies were to blame; that plumbers (he was talking about one that came in to fix his boiler…) will declare something beyond repair because they know an insurance company (and, ultimately, premium payers like you and me) will pick up the bill, however inflated.

Back to the plumber who had come round about a non-urgent job – my toilet flush. I had little idea about the price for the job but I think he assumed I’d say ‘go ahead’ whatever the cost. I didn’t – I said I’d consult my other half about it when I heard the cost – twice the price of the plumber I eventually used. He went off in a bit of a huff making me feel guilty for not giving him the job (maybe that was the idea?) I also felt bad when a gate supplier sent me a short text message saying ‘you get what you pay for’ after I told him I’d gone with a quote that was 40% lower than his. I suspect I’m being too sensitive; that one-man (and yes, they tend to be men) providers of domestic services see the to-ing and fro-ing around prices as a normal part of running a small business.

But what about the multinational providers? I was advising someone recently about the art (it’s not a science) of pricing products and services; about how the cost of his time and his expertise might fit into the equation I’ve outlined above. We got on to talking about the ridiculous price of printer ink (often more than the cost of the printer itself, and many times more expensive than the finest champagne). I learnt from him that the brand leaders have invested heavily in making their printer ink of such a viscosity that other inks clog up the printer jets if you use so-called ‘remanufactured’ cartridges. Once again big companies are locking us into making them money by cutting out alternatives – so much for competition!

Meanwhile, my bathroom toilet is now flushing fine. I’m still waiting for the wooden gate…

 A related blog post: https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2016/01/05/value-cost-and-price/

Being last, not fast

“There is more to life than increasing its speed” Mahatma Gandhi

My dear old dad hated school sports. He told me he was so determined not to come last in running races (he had standards…) that he once ended up in second place and was annoyed that he had to run again in another heat!

At the weekend I recalled my dad’s remark about not coming last when attending my local parkrun. I’ve written other blog posts about my love of parkrun – particularly that it’s about community rather than competition – but last Saturday’s experience was a first for me – I came last!

My time was 00.55.41 for the 5K – the slowest of 304 parkrunners – but that was all part of the plan as I was a ‘tail walker’. It involves making sure everyone returns safe and sound at the end of their run/walk/whatever. My hour-long walk around the route was a joy – very fresh air (a good blow in bright sunshine), great exercise in beautiful National Trust surroundings, and friendly chat – mainly with my co-tail walker who’s recovering from a hamstring injury. We talked about everything from sports injuries obviously, to dogs, caring duties, films, and the NHS.

It wasn’t quite a stroll in the park, but I was pleased there was no pressure (self-imposed or otherwise) to do other than finish the 5K circuit… last. I feel society is increasingly inclined to make us think that fast is desirable – that cramming more and more into our already busy lives is ‘a good thing’.

The idea of slowing things down is, of course, nothing new – the slow food movement in Italy dates back to the late 1980s https://www.slowfood.com.  I bought Carl Honore’s intriguing bestseller In Praise of Slow soon after it was published in 2004  https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Carl-Honore/In-Praise-of-Slow–How-a-Worldwide-Movement-is-Challengin/1980344 and I’d probably buy The Idler (a bi-monthly magazine for people who like to live in the slow lane https://www.idler.co.uk) if I had time to read it.

On a similar theme, if there was a competition for firing up your laptop, mine would probably come last. Every time I sit there after switching on my computer, I’m reminded of an early marketing database I used which allowed me time enough to make a cup of tea while it was selecting records from a list of 10,000 book-buyers. Fast forward three decades and, for all my impatience while waiting to use my computer, I’m grateful for the enforced delay as an opportunity for some mindful reflection at the beginning on the working day.

To coincide with its 15th anniversary, parkrun-UK commissioned some research  https://blog.parkrun.com/uk/2019/10/05/not-just-run-park. Two findings particularly interested me – firstly, that volunteering at parkrun was found to be better for our health and well-being than just running or walking the 5K. Interestingly the role of tail walker has been renamed in recent years – it used to be ‘tail runner’ – and this relates to a second research finding; that the average time for the 5K circuit had increased year-on-year – reflecting the growing number of people taking up parkrun (and running?) for the first time.

Looking more widely at slowing down society I don’t think I’m inclined to start a ‘come last’ campaign, but anything we can do to find more flexible ways of working (I’m right behind the campaign for a four day working week https://www.4dayweek.co.uk ) and to reduce the pressure on the next generation, is to be welcomed as a route to improved well-being.

Related blog posts:

https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2017/08/16/counting-what-counts

https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2019/06/01/coming-from-behind

https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2019/07/29/my-four-day-weekend

Running Repairs

I was thinking about the phrase ‘running repairs’ this weekend while marshaling at Wimpole parkrun (no virtue signalling intended). You know how some TV and radio programmes – To Hull and Back springs to mind – sound like they’ve thought of the title first and then developed the idea behind the title; well, this could be the case with the idea of Running Repairs.

The phrase combines two of my passions – getting free exercise and giving free fixes – which got me thinking… What if runners with relevant skills could be matched with local residents with things that needed fixing. This could be a lightbulb or fuse to be changed, a dripping tap, a button that needs sewing back on, a bike chain that needs adjusting, anything that needs lubricating, gluing or cleaning – the list goes on. It would be a free, non-emergency, accessible service, but only for small jobs; you wouldn’t want to put professional handy-people and repairers out of business.

The idea is not wholly original – some readers may know about GoodGym a brilliant national initiative which brings groups of runners together to do ‘good work’ in their community. They run to locations to do this – for example to do a litter pick in a local park or a village hall to paint a room. They also support older individuals with small tasks and companionship. Nor is free community repair a novelty – we’ve been running a quarterly Repair Café in Royston for the past six years.

Why the ‘running repairs’ idea is a bit different from a community event is that the interaction with residents is 1-2-1 in their homes, and the fixes would tend to be for people who, for one reason or another, can’t attend a community event (and you can’t bring in a dripping tap or light socket…)

So, an idea to combine keeping bodies and things working well, connecting communities and creating friendships along the way – good for people and the planet. What do you think – has ‘Running Repairs’ got, er… legs?  Please let me know.

https://www.goodgym.org

www.facebook.com/RoystonRepairCafe

Slow fashion

My work colleague is off to buy a prom dress with her daughter. If you know anything about my colleague and proms (I don’t mean the musicfest at the Albert Hall each year) you’ll know the dress is for her daughter.

I don’t know the history of the school prom in this country (it probably originates from the USA) but it’s a semi-formal post-exam celebration for secondary school students. Wikipedia says it’s a shortened version of Promenade Dance. For the girls or, more likely their parents, it can cost £££ for the prom dress and, as my colleague pointed out the other day,       ‘all the other stuff’.

I suspect most prom dresses are only worn once; an extreme example of the worst waste of the ‘fast fashion’ industry. (Incidentally, did you know the average DIY power drill is used for only 13 minutes of its life?) Given that the younger generation seem to be more in tune with the climate emergency than their parents, it’ll be interesting to see if there’s any downturn in the (new) prom dress market in the coming years. I’d like to think that campaigns are slowing fashion, alongside the emerging range of alternatives to excessive spending on clothes – renting, sharing, upcycling, donating – making secondhand, pre-loved, vintage (chose your own adjective) clothes not only acceptable, but desirable.

At the high-end of the re-worn clothing market is Wardrobe HQ – a luxury fashion rental and resale website. I say ‘high-end’ and your rented designer coat could still set you back £295 for a week, and a sequinned bodycon (whatever that means!) mini could cost you a maxi £215.

Interviewed in the Guardian newspaper, Wardrobe HQ Chair Jane Shepherdson is quoted as saying the idea of clothing rental is particularly appropriate for luxury womenswear, with ski-wear, occasion wear, maternity wear and kids-wear other areas ripe for rental. Personally, I think she’s got that the wrong way around; maternity wear and kids-wear should come first as it affects so many more people. But then maybe I’m looking at this through an environmental/community lens rather than a commercial one.

A similar but much more affordable clothing option that’s geographically and conceptually much closer to my heart is Nuw. Based in Cambridge, Nuw describes itself as a clothes-sharing app and community; they’re all about sharing, not renting. I met the people behind Nuw at a Swish (clothing exchange event) in Cambridge and they seemed to have their hearts and heads in the right place.

In the west country, the fine folk of Frome in Somerset have taken the community clothes exchange concept a step further. The Frome Wardrobe Collective organise swapping events, but also have a small ‘community wardrobe’ in a converted public toilet (a case of deja loo?) alongside their community fridge and larder – the first such fridge in the UK when it was set up more than two years ago. From 8am to 8pm people can leave their ‘occasion clothes’ for others to borrow.

Closer to home, Circular Cambridge are promoting slow fashion through discussions and events, including a festival and Swishes. Swishes are volunteer-run and usually free and tend to feature women’s and children’s wear (the only man I know who’s into secondhand clothing does his shopping for designer items in charity shops in posh places). Circular Cambridge also organise Repair Cafes and more often than not these include sewing and mending facilities as part of their free offer – anyone for a bit of upcycling?

Not forgetting community exchange platforms such as Freegle (many localities also have Facebook groups for local exchange or sale of pre-loved items) and charity shops are another great source of affordable clothes.

I’m sure I won’t have to persuade my colleague about considering these alternatives to prom-dress-buying – a way to save money and the planet. I suspect that convincing her daughter might be somewhat harder…

https://www.mywardrobehq.com

https://www.thenuwardrobe.com

https://edventurefrome.org/enterprises-initiatives/frome-wardrobe-collective

http://circularcambridge.org/category/blog/fashion

http://www.getswishing.com

https://www.ilovefreegle.org

Wise words from StartUp 2020

For a third year I’m in Central London on a frosty Saturday morning in January to learn from an impressive line-up of speakers advising 2,000 aspiring young entrepreneurs about putting head and heart into starting a business.

For the past two years I’ve reported on what I learned and readers of this blog seemed to find that useful, so here are a few quotes I picked up during a packed day of keynote talks and workshops expertly organised by Enterprise Nation.

It’s about you

“When you’re starting a brand, people are buying you… think about having a head-shot [photo in your publicity]” EJ

“Know your story and use images consistently… think Richard Branson.” EJ

“Accept full responsibility for where you are and where you’re going. Show up every day, put yourself out there, and take risks.” SAO

“There are two sales in business – the first is selling you to you, the second sale is you to others.” SAO

Don’t measure your success by other people’s metrics… know your own premium value.” SAO

“Focus on what you do best and outsource the rest.” EJ

Mindset is one of the most important tools on your journey… It can turn interest into commitment, indecision into decision, problems into opportunities, lack of resources into being resourceful and creative.” SAO

“Focus on all that you are, not what you are not. The only person you should compare yourself to is who you were yesterday.” SAO

“Solitude can lead to real clarity in business.” GT

Getting started

“Don’t get nervous about telling other people about your idea… sharing your start-up story warms up your [future] customers and builds your brand profile.” EJ

“Until you do it, you don’t understand your business – and talk to people.” AP-A

“When pitching your business idea, always be prepared, make it personal – make phone calls and ‘stand up and smile’ when you do so!” EJ

“I used my unique story to create an online community of people who felt the same.” TRW

“I found it really important to create a specific ‘ideal customer’ – we paid to get help with this. We used the detailed profile for targeting all our communications… To widen our audience, we then identified people who ‘aspired to be our ideal customer’.” TRW

“To turn interest into commitment, come up with reasons why, reduce distractions, plan your day the night before.” SAO

“Don’t over-research – just do it! It doesn’t have to be perfect – put it out there and get feedback.” NG

 “[Looking back] our best business idea was the one with the most differentiation from the competition (our USP) and ease of entry into the market.” AC

“There’s a fine line between procrastination and intentional rest.” SAO

Routes to success

“The only way to know if you’ve got something is to try it with your customers… be brave.” RS

“Our customers are the biggest force in deciding what we should be doing.” AC

“A passion turned into a business doesn’t really feel like work… But it takes hard work, so it makes it easier to put the time in.” EJ

“Your value is how much you offer against what you take in payment.” SAO

 “The worst things in life often lead to wisdom, insight and skills for the best times in your life.” SAO

“Having a clear purpose is important for pushing on when the going gets difficult.” KL

“Resilience in a number one skill to learn… try everything, challenge everything.” GT

“Look at your core business and invest in that. Don’t cut corners, collaboration can help.” NG

Working well

“As an entrepreneur, there’s no point in working on your vision if you burn out in the process.” SAO

“Take time for reflection and be more mindful; creativity will blossom… Thomas Edison used to take two hours a day to go fishing – without bait ‘so no one will disturb me, not even the fish’.” SAO

“How you start your day is important – a balance between stability and excitement about the challenge. Set your morning routine and have a good quality breakfast.” ED

“Know your team… their backgrounds, their interests beyond work. Enjoying being with them is important for the tough days. Care about them and the space they work in.” KL   

AC – Adam Carnell, Instantprint

AP-A – Abena Poku-Awuah, Legacy

ED – Evelina Dzimanaviciut, Elite Mind

EJ – Emma Jones, Enterprise Nation

GT – Guy Tolhurst, Intelligent Partnership

KL – Katrina Larkin, Fora

NG – Natalie Glaze, StayWildSwim

RS – Rachel Stockey, Kings College London

SAO – Simon Alexander Ong, business and life coach

TRW – Tim Rundle Wood, Twoodle Co

Thank you, and to Enterprise Nation for bringing us all together  www.enterprisenation.com 

https://www.enterprisenation.com/learn-something/the-top-eight-gamechanging-pieces-of-advice-we-heard-at-startup-2020

Other StartUp tips:

https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2019/01/23/wise-words-from-startup-2019

https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2018/01/15/enterprise-essentials-21-tips-from-startup-2018

 

Now you have no excuse

I’ve followed Jen Gale’s wise words on being green since, what I’ve recently learnt, was her first public-speaking engagement – a TEDx talk in Bedford in July 2013 which she describes as ‘terrifying’. I was part of the group organising the TEDx event and as well as introducing me to Jen, it also sparked an ongoing interest in TEDx events around the East of England (including speaking at one of them which, I can confirm, is terrifying!)

As well as an interest in TEDx Talks and sustainable living, I also have a passion for real books (for details check out a blog post in the ‘My love affair with…’ series). This interest includes 15 years in book marketing and sales and explains my addiction to buying printed books, some of which end up in the Little Library outside our house. So, when I saw that Jen Gale had written The Sustainable(ish) Living Guide I couldn’t resist being consumer(ish) and I bought a copy.

Being a grumpy old pedant, I notice it’s not printed on recycled paper, but it’s ‘responsibly sourced’ and, since I refuse to read e-books, that has to be good enough. If you don’t know already, you’ll soon learn that trying to ‘do the right thing’ when it comes to behaving sustainably it’s often not straight forward. Try looking at the relevant carbon footprints of plastic, paper and cotton bags.

What I like about the Sustainable(ish) Living Guide is that it doesn’t pretend there are easy answers, but it does address the common concerns that I suspect many of us share. To quote from the book’s introduction… ‘This is for you if you’re worried about the state of the planet, but you’re just not sure where to start or what to do… It’s for you if you feel a kind of low-level guilt about the things you do every day, knowing that there is a better way, but you’re up to your eyes in work and family and life stuff, and it doesn’t feel like there’s the time or energy to make big changes.’

But here’s the good news – all effort, however small, is worthwhile and Jen Gale’s guide provides an abundance of (jargon alert) quick-wins that won’t involve a radical change to the way you live nor having to find more hours in the day to make an impact.

And she doesn’t just cover day-to-day living. My love of books attracted me to one idea for an alternative advent calendar – involving books – and, similarly, Jen’s ideas for more ethical Valentine’s Day presents reminded me about the idea of giving family and friends ‘a blind date with a book’, bought from a charity shop and wrapped (in newspaper of course).

Charity shops cropped up again in a section about how many donations, however well-intentioned, end up in landfill because clothes are unwearable or toys and equipment are broken. This got me thinking… could volunteer repairers in Repair Cafes (also commended in the book) team up with local charity shops to fix donated items – increasing income to those charities and, of course, saving stuff from landfill. So, the book has already helped me make connections!

If this book does nothing else, I think it gives the reader hope, and ideas, and some answers. What is comes down to is that each one of us is personally more powerful than we might imagine. And it’s not all about costing more; many of the actions to save the planet can actually save us money. When we do have to spend, we have choices about where and how we do this. We have no local bookshop where I live, but by buying The Sustainable(ish) Living Guide online from Hive Books, I support a company that pays it’s taxes and gives a share of the purchase price to my nominated independent bookshop.

My make do and mend year – Jen Gale TEDx Talk  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCm7aBM7EeY

Buy the book https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Jen-Gale/The-Sustainableish-Living-Guide–Everything-You-Need-to-K/23879824

Visit the website https://www.asustainablelife.co.uk