Tag Archives: marketing

This is a smart blog post

I was thinking about the word ‘smart’ the other day – as I drank from a bottle with ‘smartwater’ written all over it. The trendy label claimed the container was a plant bottle (meaning it was ‘up to 30% made from plants’) and the water was ‘vapour distilled with added electrolytes’ whatever that means.

In fact, I was drinking tap water – nothing particularly smart about that except it’s a fraction of the price, but the bottle’s a good size (850 mls) and fairly robust so I’m hanging on to it – no single-use plastic (however smart it is) for me if I can help it.

It wasn’t until sometime later I saw on the label – in very small print – the name ‘Coca Cola’. So this looks like some smart branding on their part (to appeal to people like me?)

I wondered what had happened to the ‘SmartWater’ of yesteryear – a theft deterrent liquid that was painted onto equipment that was then only visible under ultraviolet light. The idea was that you could paint your postcode onto your bike frame (for example). If your bike was stolen and recovered by someone with an ultraviolet light, it could be returned to its owner. I wonder whether it’s still in use….

Perhaps I should have mentioned that I was not being particularly smart while drinking the water; I was driving along a smart motorway (no – I wasn’t in a Smart car) on my way to Worcester. For those who don’t know – a smart motorway (formerly managed motorway) is… a section of motorway in Great Britain that uses active traffic management (ATM) techniques to increase capacity by use of variable speed limits and hard shoulder running at busy times. So now you know, and at least I wasn’t using my smart phone while drinking water and driving…

Which brings me to ‘smart working’. It was the subject of a blog post 18 months ago examining the logic behind ‘agile working’ ‘flexible working’ and all variations in between. I was suggesting that the concept is dressing up the idea of ‘getting more for less from employees’ to make it look new, dynamic and… well… smart.

So, what have I concluded about the use of the word ‘smart’? I may be an old cynic (I’m certainly an old pedant) but I see it in the same light as the word ‘exciting’ – it’s made to make something look or sound sexier and more interesting and desirable than it is; as if we ourselves become smarter by using the product – drink, phone, crime deterrent, motorway, or way of working.

Talking of a final ‘smart’ – Billy Smart – now he really was bright. Born one of 23 children he worked on fairgrounds until, with his brothers, he created what was the world’s largest travelling circus under canvas in the 1960s. Later, after a failed attempt to buy Blackpool Tower, he came up with the safari park idea and Windsor Safari Park went on to attract 2.5 million visitors a year.

On so-called smart working… https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2018/04/02/is-agile-working-the-answer

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Wise words from StartUp 2019 

Last Saturday I was in London for StartUp 2019 – a wonderful diverse gathering of entrepreneurs at all stages in their business start-up journeys (it seems we all have to be on a ‘journey’ these days). I’d been so impressed by StartUp 2018 I just had to return; I wasn’t disappointed…  

On getting started

“You have to ask a lot of favours at the start. Talk to as many people as possible and you may get lucky.” Tugce Bulut @tugcebulut Streetbees

“Don’t start promoting your new business too early; people get bored. 6 – 8 weeks before you launch is enough time to build interest and excitement.”  Jo Tutchener-Sharp @scampanddudejo Scamp & Dude

 “At the start I was vomiting every day through stress. Stress is a function of uncertainty and when you start a business everything is uncertain. I didn’t understand all the elements [of starting a business] – all start-ups go through this at some stage.” Steve Moore @flightclubdarts Flight Club Social Darts

“ Startup is the hardest you’ll ever work; forget work-life balance. For success it will be all-consuming – it takes a lot, it’s not for the faint-hearted.“ Jo Tutchener-Sharp @scampanddudejo Scamp & Dude

“Don’t jump too soon [from your paid employment] … when you go fulltime so much more will happen. I took a sabbatical when our business started.”  Amber Fraser, @Bravefoods Brave Foods

 “There’s no point in turning up unless you’re going to do quality. It costs the same to do a bad job badly as a good job well.”  Mike Soutar @mikesoutar

“Hold off getting your first employee as long as possible. You’ll know when the time is right – for me it was starting to do a bad job, I was reducing my face-to-face contact [with clients and other stakeholders]” Amber Fraser, @Bravefoods Brave Foods

On funding your start-up

“Don’t raise money until you have to (and don’t listen to people that tell you otherwise)” Tugce Bulut @tugcebulut Streetbees

 “I told my first investors (43 friends) – ‘whatever you invest, expect to lose it’.” Steve Moore @flightclubdarts Flight Club Social Darts

“It was eight months before we got our first investment – through cold-calling but via connections… You need to be clear about your ambitions and risk tolerances. With money you can make mistakes but blowing your life-savings is best avoided!” Amber Fraser, @Bravefoods Brave Foods

On choosing an investor… “There’s a real difference between a ‘cash provider’ and a ‘passionate partner’… If you have the right partner it doesn’t feel like you’re giving away part of your business; more like you’re gaining.” Tugce Bulut @tugcebulut Streetbees

The importance of other people

“Employing the right people is almost the hardest part of any business – if you get it right everything else falls into place, bit it takes time and mistakes.” Tugce Bulut @tugcebulut Streetbees

“You can be a lone wolf, but if you want to scale your business you need to establish relationships you can trust early on. Draw on your past experience and contacts – you can’t be an expert at everything!” Ross Jones @brandfarmfilms Brand Farm Films

“Have a strong business partner or someone else you can share your bad days with.”

“Your support network is incredibly important. You need people around you to remind you it’s not good for your health to immerse yourself in your business.” Tugce Bulut @tugcebulut Streetbees

“Have someone to whom you’re ‘accountable’ – it could be someone in a different business.”

“When you’re feeling down, go back to your clients and users [why you’re in business] it will give you a lot of energy.” Tugce Bulut @tugcebulut Streetbees

Marketing – what works?

“It’s important you’ve got a point of difference. Imagine you’re opening a magazine of your choice – could it feature your product/ brand; is it newsworthy?   Jo Tutchener-Sharp @scampanddudejo Scamp & Dude

“Building credibility, trust, face-to-face relationships, and referrals” Tugce Bulut @tugcebulut Streetbees

 “Find influencers who believe in what you’re doing – not necessarily the people with the biggest following, it’s important they are the right sort of person’”  Jo Tutchener-Sharp @scampanddudejo Scamp & Dude

“Three mistakes with PR [press/public relations]: a fear of self-promotion; having no press hook [for your approach to media outlets]; going in cold [so do your research before approaching a journalist]” Amanda Ruiz @amandaruizuk

On PR on a budget… “Don’t ‘say and spray’ – personalise your message to journalists, get to know them, understand their work and interests. Get on their radar in a good way (don’t stalk them!) help them to help you. Pitch to the right editor in the right publication. Get into the head of the magazine’s readers (and the editor).” Amanda Ruiz @amandaruizuk

How to succeed

“I like the uncomfortable times, big challenges, building stuff, constructing a business.” Steve Moore @flightclubdarts Flight Club Social Darts

“Protecting my intellectual property was really important for me. I recommend you protect it and then stand up for yourself. I was supported by my online customers – whom I regard as friends more than followers – sharing [the infringements] and getting angry.” Jo Tutchener-Sharp @scampanddudejo Scamp & Dude

“If you go into a business with a plan to sell it, it’ll never work.” Steve Moore @flightclubdarts Flight Club Social Darts

“Ask yourself – will you still love what you’re doing in 5- 10 years? Your heart and soul should be in it when you start your business.”   Jo Tutchener-Sharp @scampanddudejo Scamp & Dude

“Base your price on the market, not your costs.” Steve Moore @flightclubdarts Flight Club Social Darts

“Not everyone is going to invent Facebook. Ideas are overrated – it’s the execution that matters.” Ross Jones @brandfarmfilms Brand Farm Films

“If you’re a good leader, it’s because you can make decisions, quickly, with limited data. Some will be good decisions, some bad…. Decision-making to a businessman is like clay to a sculptor.” Mike Soutar @mikesoutar

“We look at four areas of risk: financial (mainly cashflow); people (having good staff); operational (coping with growth, including space); change (limiting your ‘operational debt’).”  Steve Moore @flightclubdarts Flight Club Social Darts

On embracing change…

“Be brave, your business plan will change, go with it – be open to change, consider the implications of each new step.” Carly Menken, Head of SME Trading, Direct Line for Business

“Don’t be afraid of what you don’t know – find out, learn, it will get sorted.” Hayley McClelland, The Fairy Dogmothers

“Back yourself – talk to others in a similar position” Ross Jones @brandfarmfilms Brand Farm Films

“Be willing to accept change and reflect on making the most of it. Make time to step back from the day-to-day – let the thinking part of your brain take over from the execution part – to be strategic.” Amber Fraser, @Bravefoods Brave Foods

“Learn how to ‘chunk down’. It’s easy to get overwhelmed, so break down [your challenges] into parts, small milestones. Change your perspective – if you have a ‘freeze moment’ go away, re-think, take a chance, learn from failure.” Carly Menken, Head of SME Trading, Direct Line for Business

And finally…

A new word: Brexhaustion. Two new abbreviations: EIS – Enterprise Investment Scheme (‘like Giftaid for investors’) and UGC – User Generated Content. A career-change website with an emphasis on business start-up https://www.escapethecity.org A book recommendation: https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Jamie-Waller/Unsexy-Business–How-12-entrepreneurs-in-ordinary-busines/22722516

What I learned at StartUp 2018  https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2018/01/15/enterprise-essentials-21-tips-from-startup-2018 

Trade secrets – most sales people give up too soon

What they don’t tell you about starting a business

People in businesses make far too many assumptions about how publicity materials are received by would-be customers. They think that communicating once is enough and then believe no response means no interest.

In reality, the message probably hasn’t even reached the intended recipient – real life and 101 other obstacles can get in the way of clear communication. Also, timing is everything – we don’t read estate agents’ publicity until we need to buy or sell a house.

A friend used to give his most potentially important customers seven opportunities to ignore publicity about his latest product before giving up (admittedly each one was worth about £50,000). My rule of thumb is to assume it takes three communications for people to register a product, service, event etc exists, and five for them to do anything about it.

So don’t give up too soon. This doesn’t mean pestering potential customers, it means some gentle reminders through different communication channels over a decent period.

For other Trade Secrets in this series, go to https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/category/trade-secrets

Enterprise essentials #1 – 21 tips from StartUp 2018

It’s January 13th 2018 and hundreds of entrepreneurs both young and old (but mainly young) are gathered in East London to consider anything and everything to do with starting a business. A great day with loads on on offer – so ‘pick and mix’ was the way to go.

The event was also refreshingly free from business bullshit and the hero-worshipping of edgy, sweary entrepreneurs spouting ‘awesome’, ‘cool’ and ‘disruptive’ all day. In no particular order (as they say on Strictly) I picked up the following tips by keeping my ears pinned back during the day.

  1. The recommended maximum number of questions and completion time for market research surveys is 22 questions and seven minutes (after that there’s a severe drop in response rates)
  2. Success in starting  business is largely down to a combination of ideas, skills and persistence, and lot of them – 90% of business start-ups fail within a year, 47% of retail businesses survive for 10 years
  3. Making products is not business, selling products is the business
  4. Focus on your passions, understand the core mission of your new business, be clear why you are different from other similar businesses (the competition)
  5. The difference between masculine and feminine marketing is the difference between ‘hard sell’ and ‘heart sell’
  6. Talk to as many people as possible- share your ideas freely. Unless your product is technical, forget patents (they’re expensive) and concentrate on protecting your trade mark
  7. Get your products out there as soon as possible – stop talking, start selling – just do it!
  8. Write down 50 people you think should know about your new business, decide how you’re going to reach them, and tell them
  9. “Success is selling something that doesn’t come back to people who do” A cliche, but true.
  10. Work hard, be nice to people, do your research, know your customers, be prepared to sacrifice sleep
  11. Start small, never stop learning and the business will grow with you
  12. When you start out in business think about your definition of success – is it making money, making a difference, or what?
  13. Ideas are worthless, execution is everything
  14. In your business pitch start with the pain for your customers
  15. When you start business planning, list all your assumptions and test each one [before someone else asks you awkward questions]
  16. Mentors are great for keeping you on track and keeping you going, particularly at start-up stage
  17. The highs and lows are more extreme when starting your own business [rather than working in someone else’s]
  18. Know your strengths and [particularly] your weaknesses when starting a business
  19. Tough times at start-up stage can be a springboard for great business development
  20. Understand your brand, focus on the core of your mission, follow your passion, talk to lots of people
  21. Starting a business takes three times as long as you think it will

Further support from www.enterprisenation.com and http://www.princes-trust.org.uk/help-for-young-people/support-starting-business

 

Trade secrets – marketing is cheap and easy

What they don’t tell you about starting a business

Marketing professionals who sell their services to businesses have to convince others that marketing is difficult so they (the businesses) need to employ someone else to do it. Without belittling the art of the marketer, a lot of good marketing is common-sense communication demanding time rather than money.

At the start-up stage, when money is tight, doing your own marketing is probably the best use of your time. When the business is established and growing, that might be the time to think about employing the services of marketing specialists, but managing that discipline and remaining in control will still be important – to make sure the business goes in the direction you want.

After my day-long marketing training days I tell learners that if they do half of what they’ve learnt during the training day, they’ll probably be doing twice as much marketing as the average small business. They find this hard to believe, but many businesses often fail to even get the basics of marketing right (which may be why they remain ‘small’ businesses?) So maybe you do need to employ the professionals after all…

For other Trade Secrets in this series, go to  https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/category/trade-secrets

The power of networking

Many years ago I went to a talk in Cambridge by Hilton Catt, co-author of The Power of Networking. I don’t know whether the publicity was ambiguous or what but, it being Cambridge, there was a digital divide within the audience – one half thought it would be about virtual networks, the other half thought it would be about ‘real’ human networks.

I’m pleased to say it was about the power of the face-to-face – in Hilton Catt’s case, for job-hunting. I was unemployed at the time and, while the evening didn’t result in my immediate employment, it reinforced what I’d been told by other jobhunters and confirmed my belief in the benefit of seeking and nurturing contacts for both professional and personal progression.

To this day, I still think you can’t beat close encounters of the personal kind – even in our tech-rich, time-poor working lives – and more so in an age of faux online friends, false news, and reality TV shows that suggest that, in business, someone has to lose for you to win.

Call me old-fashioned, but my experience of working with small business start-ups for more than a decade is that they have far more to gain by sharing their ideas (rather than protecting them) and seeking partners for mutually beneficial relationships. I’m not starry-eyed about collaboration and co-operation (as opposed to competition) but I recommend it daily, and will do so until someone convinces me there’s a better way.

In my day-job I support young people in their efforts to turn business ideas into viable and hopefully sustainable enterprises. Entrepreneurship can be a lonely road to take, so I encourage then to seek out like-minded people – even the competition – for advice about mistakes made, lessons learnt, and what works well.

The young entrepreneurs are constantly astonished and delighted by the helpfulness of others (people who remember when they were starting out maybe) with no expectation of a payback. I also pull in my own personal and professional contacts when I can. In the last six months, I’ve fixed a fence erector up with a van, I’ve arranged a would-be photographer’s night at a music awards ceremony in London as professional snapper’s assistant, I’ve unearthed (pun intended) a garden designer to pass judgement on a newbie designer’s work, and I’ve steered others towards potential collaborators, including business networks.

The day that ‘who you know’ becomes less important than ‘what you know’ and online communications make face-to-face connections unnecessary, I think I’ll pack up and head for the hills (preferably somewhere there’s no broadband).

Beyond the garden wall

IMG_8881“The grass is always greener where you water it” Neil Barringham

When I left book publishing in London after 15 years, I had a dramatic career change – working as a Community Enterprise Coordinator in the Cambridgeshire Fens. That beautifully stark part of the country is another world where, I was told, change happens by generations.

Like many relatively remote rural areas, if you aren’t born in the Fens, you’re an in-comer for ever. Imagine my situation then – I didn’t even live in Cambridgeshire, let alone the Fens, and the European Union was paying me to tell the local population who’d been there for generations how to live their lives. And I had absolutely no formal qualifications for the job.

I’d been advised that I had two advantages – I was male and mature. I’d never been described as mature before, but they were right; people did at least give me a hearing. But then on my third day in the job, someone said ‘you know Chris, we’re a terribly self-sufficient lot’. I knew I wouldn’t have people queuing up outside my door asking for help.

Then I got some great advice from a community development worker in Devon who’d been in the field (literally) much longer than my two weeks. She said, and this is the point of this blog…

“Think of yourself as a gardener, sowing seeds. You plant the ideas and if some of them sprout, you water them and nurture them. If they shrivel up, you know they’re non-starters and you plant other seeds in, you hope, more fertile soil. And don’t give up trying – it might just be the wrong time of the year.”

I found that advice amazingly useful over the following 18 months – it was an analogy that fitted the rural soundings and helped me explain my role to local people.

And then the gardening analogy cropped up (pun intended) when I was back in London working with the biggest and friendliest charity that’s ever been foolish enough to employ me.

In the course of advising people about business planning, I learnt about SHARE Community in south west London – a charity that provides training, education and personal development for disabled people and those experiencing social exclusion. SHARE Community’s CEO Annie McDowall describes a strategic planning day with a difference…

“To be honest, I was a bit bored with the same old format … SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analysis. This was my first away-day with SHARE and I wanted to make it special. Also, I wanted to include a fair number of SHARE clients all of whom experience some level of disability…

SHARE has a horticultural project and we’re all very enthusiastic about it… How about we did a SWOT by imagining SHARE as a garden? We could use art materials to build up a picture with strength represented by trees, ladybirds and so on, weaknesses as weeds, slugs etc, opportunities as birds and bees, threats as greenfly – that sort of thing…

The next part of the planning session looked at what features of SHARE we wanted to keep and what to throw away. We kept the metaphor of the garden identifying what were weeds (to be got rid of) and what were hardy perennials (hold on to them). Next we asked each group to identify new garden features they wanted to introduce to SHARE. This was a really useful exercise because it produced a list of action points for the year ahead.”

Even though that planning session happened over a decade ago, it struck a chord with me as a brilliant idea. It’s remained in my memory because it connected at a higher level.

I’m pleased to say the garden analogy (or is it a metaphor? I never know) is still thriving – another intended pun. Just last week I read two blogs – from that wise man at Strategic Edge, Nicholas Bate, and the other was a 2013 blog post from another insightful writer – Seth Godin. Nicholas linked gardening to business, parenting and life, and in Seth’s blog he observes “Great projects start out feeling like buildings… but in fact, great projects, like great careers and relationships that last, are gardens.”

So plant seeds, grow well, and may your life, career and relationships bloom.

Further reading:

Nicholas Bate’s blog http://blog.strategicedge.co.uk/2016/01/mmmm-5.html

Seth Godin’s blog http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2013/07/gardens-not-buildings.html

SHARE Community’s gardening enterprise http://www.sharecommunity.org.uk/social-enterprise/share-gardening