Tag Archives: physical exercise

Walking the talk

You know about dog-walking and house-sitting, but what about people-walking?

To be honest, when I first heard about this I thought it was a ridiculous idea – another fad from America. I was dismissive because it sounded like a service for people who are just too lazy to do their own walking.

In fact, it is an idea from the USA; I first heard about people-walking from an exponent from California. As he described his typical clients (I think it’s become a viable business) I changed my mind…

Some people feel safer walking with something else, others who are new to an area want to find their way around with someone with local knowledge. Some want the reassurance of having a walking partner because of poor physical ill-health. The last customer segment he identified as lone workers (who may also be home-based) who simply miss the company of another human during the working day. Walking and talking are objectively ‘a good thing’, so what’s not to like.

The people-walking service was profiled as part of a radio programme about confiding in others and, of course, this is what happens between regular clients and the people-walker. Walkers start to confide in the people-walker because, as we know, it’s sometimes easier to share our innermost secrets and concerns with those we’re not too close to. The professional distance between the two walkers is important and avoids the baggage that comes with family members and friends.

It also illustrates an observation from the world of Men’s Sheds – that people often feel more comfortable talking shoulder-to-shoulder rather than face-to-face. So, in any relationship, not having to face the person you’re talking to may be less intimidating.

Nearly a decade ago, before I became passionate about Men’s Sheds (for passionate read ‘he can bore for England’) I thought I’d hit on a new idea for thinkers and talkers – the Walkshop™.

It wasn’t an original idea of course – I think it’s quite big in Australia – but it was borne of a personal interest. I decided that a circular walk in the countryside (preferably with a pub at the end) discussing a common topic, idea, problem etc with other like-minded people would be an enjoyable and potentially useful way to spend a couple of hours. The physical exercise, fresh air and a rural environment would stimulate the brain and promote creative thinking within the group.

That was the theory and, with the support of a very creative thinker from Bedford (thank you Kayte) we piloted it in a work and after-work situation. But the idea never really took off; life got in the way of reviewing and developing the concept. Given the apparent success of people-walking, maybe Walkshops should be for pairs of walkers, as well as groups?

I still think the Walkshop™ idea has legs (pun intended) and if others think there’s mileage (second pun intended) in developing it, feel free to take the idea [but you’d need permission from the designer to use the logo] and run with it (last pun for today) and let me know how you get on.

To link to the relevant June 2018 Radio 4 programme about people-walking, go to https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b4zwz8 To meet the people-walker, go to https://www.facebook.com/thepeoplewalker

 

How to stay healthier and happier for longer

In June 2016 I gave a TEDx Talk – ‘Male, stale and in a Shed’ with mixed success. Following that scary but exciting experience, I resolved to write a series of blog posts under a ‘No man’s land umbrella. The blog posts attempt to explore the issues in my short talk and, in particular, to try to identify the roots of my mental ill-health over the past two decades.

12 months ago I published the first of my ‘No man’s land blog posts and, although I only intended it should be a year-long series, the posts continue. The more personal they get, the harder they are to write.

One thing that writing and reflection has done is to help me identify what I think has worked for me in keeping at bay for the past two years what Churchill famously described as his ‘black dog’. There are three main ingredients in my recipe for staying healthier and happier for longer, the first is connecting…

Connecting with people – I used to say with like-minded people, but some of my most interesting recent encounters have been with people with whom I disagree but who are prepared to debate in a grown-up and respectful way. It can be scary but exciting to have your views challenged!

Connecting with places – I believe the need to belong is powerful for many people. It’s one I associate with places as well as people and it can be something as simple as going into town knowing I’ll probably meet someone I know. But it still took me around five years after moving from London to a market town of 17,000 to get that level of connection.

Connecting with our feelings – perhaps the most difficult for many older men. I try hard to fight an inbred tendency to supress emotions, particularly negative ones, and I avoid talking about my innermost concerns. I haven’t yet cracked it and I know I’m not alone. I organise school reunions and it was only six months ago that a friend from school days admitted to me something he’d told only his wife until then – that he’d been sexually assaulted when he was nine years old.

Then there’s creating… I most enjoy being in a Men’s Shed, or any shed for that matter, when problem-solving and being creative – it’s the closest I come to experiencing what they call ‘flow’. But that’s not what I’m talking about here. I mean creating stuff: making things; writing – stories, poetry; or cooking – creating a special meal, preferably to eat with others.  It could be gardening – growing plants of even creating natural colour in a garden, or maybe it’s artwork – painting or photography. It doesn’t have to be brilliant, but I think it’s important that it’s something that pleases the creator; something that matters to them. And if it pleases others, so much the better.

I once made a wooden case for carrying and displaying books. I still remember my mum – forty years ago – looking at it in wonder and saying to me and others present ‘He made this! He took pieces of wood and he made this!’ She was so proud and, looking back, so was I.

The last ingredient for staying healthier and happier for longer is carrying on… When older people say ‘I want to die’ I don’t believe them. I think when older people really want to die they simply stop carrying on – and do so. Until then there’s something – anger, curiosity, love or something else – keeping them alive.

Carry on learning: There’s a famous Gandhi quote… ‘Live like you’ll die tomorrow, learn like you’re going to live for ever.’ I love it for urging us to never stop learning new things – facts, skills, whatever. We know that learning keeps our brains ticking over and wards off deterioration. I’m learning to hula hoop – there’s no time to explain why I took it up and my longer term plans if I succeed. Suffice it to say I’m still learning!

Some years ago I read a book called ‘How to Age by Anne Karpf. I was struck by her observation that we talk about ‘growing’ old but ageing is usually seen in negative terms – a winding down rather than a process of growth and development. The University of the Third Age is the fastest growing community organisation in my home town and that delights me (I’m hoping a new Men’s Shed will come a close second) as they share that thirst for learning in later life.

Carry on moving: For me that means running and walking, for others it may be swimming, cycling, even dancing. It doesn’t have to be long, hard or fast – just regular and enjoyable (which raises the brain’s serotonin and lowers cortisol; good for managing stress)

My wife works in the NHS and knows the stresses and strains that afflict the service. As  a consumer of a full range of medications over the past 20 years – from Prozac for depression to Alendronic Acid for osteoporosis – I consider it my duty to try to now stay clear of the health service for as long as possible through self-medication with connecting, creating, and carrying on.

Male, stale and in a Shed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZ1e8FVcWEo

No man’s land https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/?s=no+mans+land