Tag Archives: purpose

Repair Shed Star – Bob

The Repair Shed brings older men (and women) together to stay healthier and happier for longer by making, mending and learning. Member profiles are based on recorded interviews by evaluator Nick Parsons

IMG_7958“Even when I’m out shopping for clothes with my partner, which I used to hate, I now look at the display units and think what we could make in the Shed”

Bob, Repair Shed member since July 2015

I really enjoy making things from wood. My background is in all aspects of computing – hardware and software. I’ve helped the odd shed member with their IT problems, but in fact getting away from computing and making things is really so relaxing and rewarding. Its learning old skills again that I learnt at school.

I come into the workshop every week, but also help on other days in the community. I helped with refurbishing an outdoor metal play train at a nursery, and went out to look at a lady’s kitchen which needed some work.

The Shed group works well – I like meeting other people. But it’s important to see others who may not be integrating so well, pair up and involve them.

Making something that was defunct work again is rewarding. I also get a buzz out of making something out of a pallet that would otherwise be scrapped. I’m now making things at home – always thinking about new ideas for things. Even when I’m out shopping for clothes with my partner, which I used to hate, I now look at the display units and think what we could make in the Shed. In the more ‘arty’ shops that have things made out of wood – I think – we could make something like that. I sometimes take photos to study back at home. Even my partner has started to look at things and suggest ideas for me!

I feel good, happy to be here meeting people. I always go away from a session with more information and understanding than when I arrived which is good. Everybody has experiences of life that they are happy to share. Having been out of work for three years, being in the Shed shows a commitment on my part and is a real boost to my confidence.

More about The Repair Shed at:

www.facebook.com/TheRepairShed                                www.communityactiondacorum.org/The-Repair-Shed

Drown your puppies

no-dogs-allowedIf you’re familiar with the Boston Matrix (a marketing tool not a Hollywood blockbuster) you’ll also probably know the term ‘dogs’. These are activities that are not making money nor contributing to the mission of the organisation being assessed.

If you identify any ‘dogs’ in your organisation the advice is to drop this activity or, as some put it more provocatively, ‘drown your puppies’.

The beauty of this particular phrase is that it grabs the reader’s attention (whether or not you’re a puppy-lover) and it also encapsulates the truth that organisations often have pet projects that are kept alive, often by the people who created them, for emotional reasons. Blind to evidence that an activity has become a waste of time and money (it may always have been so) charities are probably more guilty than the average for-profit business of getting their head and heart balance wrong. Smaller charities are particularly good at ‘flogging dead horses’ (another brutal animal image!)

For social enterprises – businesses with a social purpose – success is often defined as achieving the ‘triple bottom line’ of social, financial and environmental objectives. This makes the identification of ‘dogs’ more difficult because the activity may be justified for non-financial reasons. At the Repair Shed in Hemel Hempstead, where men aged 50+ come together to stay healthier and happier for longer through making, mending and learning, we’re dealing with ‘pet project issues’ of a different kind.

As readers of a recent blog may remember, the making part of Repair Shed members’ activity has to date largely involved using reclaimed timber to make products for homes and gardens. I think some of us have surprised ourselves with the quality of the work we’ve turned out – I know I have – pleased with the result and… reluctant to see it offered for sale.

Objectively, the Repair Shed should be trying to sell as many products as possible – to make money, create more storage space, and to save more timber from becoming waste. Subjectively however, perhaps we’re worried others might not be as proud to own the products as we were to make them. So there are mixed feelings when a project that people have been working on is sold – because making it again will never generate the same sense of achievement. The silver lining is that if your creation remains unsold, you can always take it home and show if off to friends and family who will appreciate it (or say they do).

It must be the same when starting out on any creative journey. In retirement, my friend Carl has taken up painting. This year he bravely submitted two pieces to our annual art exhibition and put a £60 price tag on each of them. Much to his surprise he sold one of them but, excited though he was, he couldn’t disguise his relief that the ‘right’ painting (ie the one in which he’d invested less time) had been bought.

It’s a tough lesson – if you want to succeed in a creative business you must be prepared to let go of your best work and risk it being under-valued.

A related blog – The paying customer is always right – is at https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2015/11/25/the-paying-customer-is-always-right

More on the Boston Matrix at http://www.oxlearn.com/arg_Marketing-Resources-The-Boston-Matrix_11_35

Eight top tips from ‘experts by experience’

Create and share the vision…

“Having a clear vision is important, particularly when well-intentioned people are in danger of diverting you. But making sure that vision is one which is shared is also important; the whole consultation process was about taking people with us. For sustainability, that strong foundation and broad backing is essential, as is having the right legal structure with community interest at its heart.”  Rosamund Webb, Station House Community Connections http://bit.ly/1wfUF6D

 Passion is important, but not enough…

“Unless you have a real desire and passion, don’t do it. Social enterprise is not a route to making money, so the desire to make a difference has to be genuine. But passion is not enough. You should learn as much as you possibly can about the subject, but don’t feel you have to do it all at once. It can’t all happen overnight, so have realistic expectations.” James Hogg, Music and Memories http://bit.ly/1p6Lwax

Be guided by your achievements and successes

When starting your business, stick with it. “You’ll have a huge idea at the start, with blurred surroundings so you can’t see how to get to your destination. But be guided by your achievements and successes.”  Amanda Keel, FullSpoon http://bit.ly/1BrZpsI

 Make it sell-able at a viable price…

“ If you want to make money [from your artwork]… you need to make it saleable and sell it at a viable price. The designs you come up with have to be commercial if that’s what you’re in it for. If you’re a creative being who wants to create art, don’t think of it as a business proposition.” Teresa Crickmar, Craftworks http://bit.ly/1qEEU8E

Get your public profile right…

“Look the part. The reason Forest Owl is getting into schools and talking to businesses is that we communicate effectively through our website and social media. We’re also building credibility by nailing our colours to the mast. We live our brand by getting out and about, not sitting indoors in an office.”  Ian Henderson, Forest Owl http://bit.ly/1xIoDEF

Learn to let go…

“Don’t underestimate the people you’re working with – particularly when they’re volunteers. Learn to let go, people are very capable and if you give them the opportunity, they’ll learn.” Nicky Kearns, Secret Space http://bit.ly/1BrZ4Gx

It takes a long time to build a reputation but a second to destroy it…

“It takes time to build up reputation and loyal customers – I favour word of mouth over any other publicity. I stress with the guys that it takes a long time to build a reputation but a second – one hair in the food – to destroy it. So we’re very strict on quality control.” Sam Speller, All Seasoned http://bit.ly/1CRpgvG

Give it a go and be patient…

“Be open to new ideas and experiences. Give something a try and if it doesn’t work out, don’t worry; it’s the trying that’s important. I stuck with jobs that didn’t suit me, resilient in the face of poor management for the sake of the children in my care, until other career stepping stones came along.”  Hannah Burns, Nurture by Nature Forest School http://bit.ly/1lTbOC8

 

More tips from Experts by Experience at:  http://bit.ly/1dQplX3

Learning about Earning: 10 lessons from a social enterprise start-up

After 12 years advising others about starting social enterprises, Chris Lee has spent the last 12 months setting up an environmental social enterprise in Hertfordshire, with the support of the School for Social Entrepreneurs in Ipswich. The Repair Shed brings older men together to stay healthier and happier for longer by making, mending and learning. Details at https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/the-repair-shed

Below Chris draws out ten lessons (2 per blog post) from the past 12 months and compares what the social enterprise start-up handbook says with his own experience.  In reality, there are no hard and fast rules – no right and wrong ways to do things, rather a series of balancing acts…

Lessons 1 and 2

 Social vs enterprise

What is social enterprise? A clue in the phrase:  Social – Enterprise but there’s no one agreed  definition.

Not a legal entity, but a business model. Social enterprise can be seen as a ‘business solutions to social problems’. Social purpose is the ‘reason for being’, while profit fuels the journey but is not the destination.

In common with other businesses… a social enterprise seeks to address the ‘triple bottom line’ addressing social, financial and environmental objectives  – getting the balance right is a constant challenge eg costing and pricing to be inclusive/affordable and viable.

Above all it’s about clarity of purpose to avoid mission drift. Gina Negus of the Projects Company in Essex) asks … is your organisation a train? – on track with a destination ahead (2- 3 years?) clear to everyone travelling in the same direction. Drawing in resources to fuel the journey, but in control (in the driving seat) with your foot on the pedal to travel at the right speed for you.

Spin vs substance

My opinion – social enterprise and social entrepreneurship is over-sold.  I’m a social enterprise enthusiast, but it’s all too easy to believe the hype and cast the private sector as the villain and social enterprises as the answer we’ve all been waiting for to treat society’s ills.

Reality, of course, is much more complex – there are good and bad private sector and social enterprise businesses, and both may have social impact. And scale if also important. Until we make enough difference to enough people, we should resist the temptation to over-egg the pudding. Holding the moral high ground is not enough. More at http://bit.ly/1qxU7rV

The same goes for sanctifying social entrepreneurs as edgy and dynamic (often scarily young!) saviours of the world. The social enterprise movement has no monopoly on entrepreneurship and social impact. In my experience the most entrepreneurial people are too busy getting on developing their next idea than to have time to shout about it! More at  http://bit.ly/1q2FZYT

In my opinion, the best way we can ‘sell’ the social enterprise model is by providing quality products, services and practices – selling on quality (not cheapness or charity as some in the sector are tempted to do…) For examples of three social enterprises that ooze quality, go to the ‘experts by experience’ profile at http://bit.ly/WujgYy

Two final tips on grounding your promotion of all things social enterprise in reality: Think carefully about what the name of your enterprise says about you http://bit.ly/1qtgLC1 – your brand – and don’t be afraid to tell the story behind your products and services http://bit.ly/1tCTIqQ

If you’re interested in exploring ways to turn ideas into action, join Chris Lee for a day-long workshop on December 4 in Chelmsford Details at www.voluntarysectortraining.org.uk/courses/event/70/Ideas-Into-Action

What makes an entrepreneurial enterprise?

light-bulb-new-businessSounds like a bit of tautology – isn’t the definition of an enterprise ‘an entrepreneurial organisation?’ I hear you say. Maybe, so … what makes one enterprise more entrepreneurial than another?

Paula Howley, ‘creator’ of the Social Enterprise Mark thinks it starts with mindsets – around the culture of an organisation.

Social enterprise is a big mind-shift. The most important thing is the culture of the organisation. You can’t set up an enterprise if you are continually having internal battles where staff members of the board are resistant. You need to identify that culture is an important part of the jigsaw and work on that.”

Below in the form of a list (for which no apologies) are eight (of many) characteristics of entrepreneurial organisations – a synthesis of the output of half a dozen thinkers and doers in the social enterprise sector. How do you stack up?

Self-awareness: You know about expertise and skills gaps in the enterpriseand take steps to plug them through training or recruitment.

Environmental awareness : You have a handle on trends and opportunities affecting your work. Some years ago Innocent Smoothies had ‘front foot’ meetings each week to avoid nasty surprises (they may still do so).

Passionate but purposeful:  You are committed and clear about your cause; it’s about balancing mission and money.

Plan for change: You’re not afraid to changeyour plan. (But you can only do so if you’ve got one!)

Fearless with figures: You understand cost, price and viability. Do you have robust financial systems?

Market understanding:You know the market – and compete on quality and customer focus. You know the difference between the customer and the consumer.

Delegated decisions: Staff are enpowered to make decisions. Drivers for a major parcel delivery firm in USA are authorised to spend up to US$100 to fix problems on the spot

Taking measured risks as a way of life:Failure is a comma, not a full stop. “Stumbling is only moving forward faster” says Ben Cohen of Ben and Jerrys Ice Cream

A final thought… Are organisations entrepreneurial or are they just a collection of entrepreneurial individuals?

Enterprise essential – How to sum up your business

Can you sum up your business succinctly to explain why you do, what you do, and how well you do it? Potential supporters (funders, investors and other stakeholders) are most interested in the ‘why’ and the ‘how well’.

 

Enterprise essential – Focus on what you do best

When funds are limited, there may be a temptation to expand your range of services to match funding criteria without real regard to your primary purpose. This should be avoided. Concentrate instead on the core activities that best further your mission, are (relatively) profitable, and which tap into your organisation’s specific expertise.