Tag Archives: repair and re-use

Slow fashion

My work colleague is off to buy a prom dress with her daughter. If you know anything about my colleague and proms (I don’t mean the musicfest at the Albert Hall each year) you’ll know the dress is for her daughter.

I don’t know the history of the school prom in this country (it probably originates from the USA) but it’s a semi-formal post-exam celebration for secondary school students. Wikipedia says it’s a shortened version of Promenade Dance. For the girls or, more likely their parents, it can cost £££ for the prom dress and, as my colleague pointed out the other day,       ‘all the other stuff’.

I suspect most prom dresses are only worn once; an extreme example of the worst waste of the ‘fast fashion’ industry. (Incidentally, did you know the average DIY power drill is used for only 13 minutes of its life?) Given that the younger generation seem to be more in tune with the climate emergency than their parents, it’ll be interesting to see if there’s any downturn in the (new) prom dress market in the coming years. I’d like to think that campaigns are slowing fashion, alongside the emerging range of alternatives to excessive spending on clothes – renting, sharing, upcycling, donating – making secondhand, pre-loved, vintage (chose your own adjective) clothes not only acceptable, but desirable.

At the high-end of the re-worn clothing market is Wardrobe HQ – a luxury fashion rental and resale website. I say ‘high-end’ and your rented designer coat could still set you back £295 for a week, and a sequinned bodycon (whatever that means!) mini could cost you a maxi £215.

Interviewed in the Guardian newspaper, Wardrobe HQ Chair Jane Shepherdson is quoted as saying the idea of clothing rental is particularly appropriate for luxury womenswear, with ski-wear, occasion wear, maternity wear and kids-wear other areas ripe for rental. Personally, I think she’s got that the wrong way around; maternity wear and kids-wear should come first as it affects so many more people. But then maybe I’m looking at this through an environmental/community lens rather than a commercial one.

A similar but much more affordable clothing option that’s geographically and conceptually much closer to my heart is Nuw. Based in Cambridge, Nuw describes itself as a clothes-sharing app and community; they’re all about sharing, not renting. I met the people behind Nuw at a Swish (clothing exchange event) in Cambridge and they seemed to have their hearts and heads in the right place.

In the west country, the fine folk of Frome in Somerset have taken the community clothes exchange concept a step further. The Frome Wardrobe Collective organise swapping events, but also have a small ‘community wardrobe’ in a converted public toilet (a case of deja loo?) alongside their community fridge and larder – the first such fridge in the UK when it was set up more than two years ago. From 8am to 8pm people can leave their ‘occasion clothes’ for others to borrow.

Closer to home, Circular Cambridge are promoting slow fashion through discussions and events, including a festival and Swishes. Swishes are volunteer-run and usually free and tend to feature women’s and children’s wear (the only man I know who’s into secondhand clothing does his shopping for designer items in charity shops in posh places). Circular Cambridge also organise Repair Cafes and more often than not these include sewing and mending facilities as part of their free offer – anyone for a bit of upcycling?

Not forgetting community exchange platforms such as Freegle (many localities also have Facebook groups for local exchange or sale of pre-loved items) and charity shops are another great source of affordable clothes.

I’m sure I won’t have to persuade my colleague about considering these alternatives to prom-dress-buying – a way to save money and the planet. I suspect that convincing her daughter might be somewhat harder…

https://www.mywardrobehq.com

https://www.thenuwardrobe.com

https://edventurefrome.org/enterprises-initiatives/frome-wardrobe-collective

http://circularcambridge.org/category/blog/fashion

http://www.getswishing.com

https://www.ilovefreegle.org

Now you have no excuse – review article

I’ve followed Jen Gale’s wise words on being green since, what I’ve recently learnt, was her first public-speaking engagement – a TEDx talk in Bedford in July 2013 which she describes as ‘terrifying’. I was part of the group organising the TEDx event and as well as introducing me to Jen, it also sparked an ongoing interest in TEDx events around the East of England (including speaking at one of them which, I can confirm, is terrifying!)

As well as an interest in TEDx Talks and sustainable living, I also have a passion for real books (for details check out a blog post in the ‘My love affair with…’ series). This interest includes 15 years in book marketing and sales and explains my addiction to buying printed books, some of which end up in the Little Library outside our house. So, when I saw that Jen Gale had written The Sustainable(ish) Living Guide I couldn’t resist being consumer(ish) and I bought a copy.

Being a grumpy old pedant, I notice it’s not printed on recycled paper, but it’s ‘responsibly sourced’ and, since I refuse to read e-books, that has to be good enough. If you don’t know already, you’ll soon learn that trying to ‘do the right thing’ when it comes to behaving sustainably it’s often not straight forward. Try looking at the relevant carbon footprints of plastic, paper and cotton bags.

What I like about the Sustainable(ish) Living Guide is that it doesn’t pretend there are easy answers, but it does address the common concerns that I suspect many of us share. To quote from the book’s introduction… ‘This is for you if you’re worried about the state of the planet, but you’re just not sure where to start or what to do… It’s for you if you feel a kind of low-level guilt about the things you do every day, knowing that there is a better way, but you’re up to your eyes in work and family and life stuff, and it doesn’t feel like there’s the time or energy to make big changes.’

But here’s the good news – all effort, however small, is worthwhile and Jen Gale’s guide provides an abundance of (jargon alert) quick-wins that won’t involve a radical change to the way you live nor having to find more hours in the day to make an impact.

And she doesn’t just cover day-to-day living. My love of books attracted me to one idea for an alternative advent calendar – involving books – and, similarly, Jen’s ideas for more ethical Valentine’s Day presents reminded me about the idea of giving family and friends ‘a blind date with a book’, bought from a charity shop and wrapped (in newspaper of course).

Charity shops cropped up again in a section about how many donations, however well-intentioned, end up in landfill because clothes are unwearable or toys and equipment are broken. This got me thinking… could volunteer repairers in Repair Cafes (also commended in the book) team up with local charity shops to fix donated items – increasing income to those charities and, of course, saving stuff from landfill. So, the book has already helped me make connections!

If this book does nothing else, I think it gives the reader hope, and ideas, and some answers. What is comes down to is that each one of us is personally more powerful than we might imagine. And it’s not all about costing more; many of the actions to save the planet can actually save us money. When we do have to spend, we have choices about where and how we do this. We have no local bookshop where I live, but by buying The Sustainable(ish) Living Guide online from Hive Books, I support a company that pays it’s taxes and gives a share of the purchase price to my nominated independent bookshop.

My make do and mend year – Jen Gale TEDx Talk  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCm7aBM7EeY

Buy the book https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Jen-Gale/The-Sustainableish-Living-Guide–Everything-You-Need-to-K/23879824

Visit the website https://www.asustainablelife.co.uk

Sharing, repairing, re-using in Royston*

There really is no planet B, so now is the time to join millions of others locally, nationally and internationally helping to tackle our climate emergency by cutting waste. The scale of the problem is mind-boggling; every week in the UK 11 million items of clothing go to landfill; that’s an annual total equal to the weight of New York’s Empire State Building. The average household owns £4,000 worth of clothing, 30% of which has not been worn in the past year. Estimates put the value of this unused clothing at around £30 billion. Time to get swishing!

Think global, act local

For many, a barrier to taking that first step to conserve resources and reduce waste is a sense of helplessness – not knowing where to start and, perhaps, feeling the problems are too immense for individuals to make a real difference. But there are ‘quick wins’ to be made (see link at the bottom of this piece) and you are not alone; a number of local initiatives are already demonstrating practical, creative (and fun!) ways to consume less and keep items out of landfill, not just in Royston but around the world.

Say yes to less – share

For nearly 15 years, and without spending a penny, the Royston Recycle online platform promoted and enabled the free exchange (freecycling) of unwanted items – from children’s toys and equipment, to household items, garden tools and musical instruments.  Between December 2004 and December 2019, over 7500 members in and around Royston posted 97,000 ‘offers’ and ‘wants’ keeping an estimated 45,000 items in use for longer.

Don’t despair – repair! 

An offspring of the Royston freecycling initiative is Royston Repair Cafe – a series of free community repair events held every three months to keep items in use for longer. Owners of broken items have discovered ‘the joy of fix’ and, since February 2014, volunteer repairers have mended over 50% of the 640 items brought in for free assessment. Everything from clothes and books to bikes and electrical equipment have been given a new lease of life to the delight of their owners – saving their money and the planet.

Creative ways to re-use materials

When it comes to crafting someone else’s waste materials into one-off additions to homes and gardens, the new kid on the block (although the two guys behind it could hardly be described as ‘new kids’!) is Green & Grey. Using mainly pallet wood (but not averse to working with driftwood, wellington boots and bike parts) the pair are using their interest in ‘making stuff’ from reclaimed materials to promote the value of original hand-made items in our increasingly mass-produced consumer society.

An even newer kid on the ‘zero waste’ block is a Royston resident’s Anahata initiative promoting and selling planet-friendly plastic-free produced and packaged products. I can recommend the shaving soap.

From sharing, repairing and reusing, to recycling. Terracycle – an international recycling company – have teamed up with residents in and around Royston to support their efforts to recycle ‘difficult materials’ – including soft plastics, toothbrushes and crisp packets. A growing number of collections points around town help raise money for charities when you make the extra effort to protect our planet for generations to come

Contacts and further information

Sustainable living https://www.asustainablelife.co.uk (Including quick wins to sustainability https://www.asustainablelife.co.uk/12-quick-sustainable-wins)

Royston Repair Café www.facebook.com/RoystonRepairCafe

Green & Grey https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/about

Anahata www.facebook.com/Anahata.Planet

Terracycle  https://www.royston-crow.co.uk/news/new-recycling-options-for-royston-residents-1-6194192

Circular Cambridge http://circularcambridge.org

Swishing http://www.getswishing.com

*This blog post is adapted from one which first appeared on The Listing magazine website in September 2019  in the ‘Hidden Royston’ series  http://www.thelistingmagazine.co.uk/category/community-news/hiddenroyston

The broken phone

The other day I was travelling to London by train minding my own business; in fact, I was literally minding my own business! I was on my way to StartUp 2019 – a brilliant day of inspiration for would-be entrepreneurs (the subject for a future blog post). I couldn’t help but overhear a conversation between a daughter and her dad sitting directly in front of me.

What caught my attention – I don’t listen in to all conversations on trains, you know – was the daughter’s declaration, while looking despondently into the palm of her hand, Cheap phones break easily. It was a profound and articulate observation from someone I’d estimate to be 10-12 years old, and it particularly struck a chord with me as I’m preparing for our 20th community repair session at the Royston Repair Café in February.

There followed a discussion between the girl and her father along the lines of …

G: Will they be able to mend the crack dad?                                                                                                 F: No – they’ll replace the whole screen                                                                                                          G: Will it be the same colour around the edge?                                                                                           F: Probably not, but your case will cover that up                                                                                        G: Will they be able to mend it straight away?                                                                                            F: No – you’ll have to leave it with them for a while                                                                                   G: Oh dear…                                                                                                                                                      F: But we can take out your sim card to use in another phone. First, we should find out how much it will cost to repair – it might be cheaper to get a new one. How much did it cost?                                   G: £135                                                                                                                                                          F: I’ll check out some prices for new phones [says Dad as he looks online on his own phone]               G: [looking over dad’s shoulder] Wow! You can get same day delivery and a special colour with that one.

Despite being impressed by technical specifications which meant nothing to me but clearly made sense to this mature pre-teen (Isn’t 3-D meant to be bad for your eyes? she asked at one point) I was heartened by what she said next…

But I’d want to keep my old phone if my case doesn’t fit a new one – it’s special. By this time the previously attentive father seemed to be more interested in buying a new phone for his daughter than she was.

I’d like to report that the conversation continued as follows…

G: No dad – I’ve decided I want to hang on to this phone – I love it and it does me fine. Getting a new one would be a waste of money and, well… wasteful.                                      F: OK – let’s  get it repaired and [looking at his own phone] amazing – it says here you can take broken phones to a local Repair Café or Restart Party and fixes are free! Or we could go to a website called iFixit and try to repair it ourselves. And there’s even a guide here to repairing cracked phone screens using something called Sugru.

I made up that last bit because, sad to say, the two travellers arrived at their destination and got off the train before me, so I’ll never know what became of that broken phone. But we can all dream, can’t we? It may be all we have to sustain us!

Help make the dream come true – spread the word…

https://therestartproject.org

https://www.ifixit.com

https://sugru.com/tech-gadget/how-to-fix-a-cracked-phone-screen.html

https://repaircafe.org/en

www.facebook.com/RoystonRepairCafe

Men’s Sheds tread lightly in Redcar

Credit: Tracy Kidd Photography

It’s said that men talk shoulder-to-shoulder, not face-to-face. This is confirmed by Shedders, mainly men of a certain age, for whom gathering in Men’s Sheds – community work-and-play spaces across the UK – means purposeful tinkering and friendly chat, well-oiled by tea.

Some of that magic will be revealed over the weekend of 23/24 September at the Festival of Thrift in Redcar – a celebration of living lightly, saving money and cutting waste. Organisers are expecting over 35,000 visitors to the free event over the weekend, and you’re invited to be one of them.

This is the first year the UK Men’s Sheds Association (UKMSA) has been at the Festival and it comes with a warm welcome from Festival Director, Stella Hall. “The Festival of Thrift is about building creative community together – and it’s great that Men’s Sheds are doing just that! We welcome the UK Men’s Sheds Association to our event and hope they will inspire a new generation to get involved.”

Throughout the weekend, UKMSA members will be sharing their skills and expertise in the Stable Block. Men, women and children can discover how to turn a wine bottle and pallet wood, into a wall-mounted candle-holder. Most Men’s Sheds make pallet wood products and some will be displayed with a chance to make simple items and have a go at dismantling a wooden pallet safely.

There will be a #FuninSheds photo competition for festival-goers with great prizes for three lucky winners. For crafty visitors, there’ll be demonstrations of pyrography (the art of decorating wood by burning the surface) a display of walking stick handle decoration, and lots more.

Further information:

Go to www.menssheds.org.uk to find your nearest Shed and advice about setting one up if there isn’t one nearby

For a BBC Countryfile profile of the Boughton on the Water Men’s Shed www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q93p9u6pl88

Discover delightful ways to have fun with thriftyness http://www.festivalofthrift.co.uk/workshops

For photos of some of the stallholders at the Festival of Thrift 2016, go to https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2016/11/21/green-and-grey-a-christmas-gift-guide

20 reads about repairing, sharing and reusing

The ‘why?’ and ‘how?’ of cutting waste, saving money and fixing the planet

If you have problems with downloading, copy and paste link in your browser

 

The Fixer’s Manifesto http://repaircafe-esslingen.de/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/sugru_manifesto.pdf   

How to run a Repair Café  http://circularcambridge.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/How-to-run-a-Repair-Cafe-updated-12April16.pdf and www.instructables.com/id/Host-a-Repair-Cafe

Keep the date – FixFest 2017 https://therestartproject.org/community/fixfest

Repair and Share Guide: profiles of 6 inspirational organisation keeping things in use for longer, plus with top tips for setting up your own http://cfsd.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Repair_and_Share_PRINT.pdf

 

What is a library of things?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNca7UVW6g4   

Citizen-driven repair: research sources www.cfsd.org.uk/research including a global survey of Repair Cafes

Eco guide to the repair economy www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jul/02/the-eco-guide-to-the-repair-economy?

A Greenpeace guide to the repair-ability of your mobile device www.greenpeace.org/eastasia/Global/eastasia/publications/reports/toxics/2017/howrepairableisyourmobiledevice.pdf  

Care and repair – your clothes http://loveyourclothes.org.uk/care-repair

Farnham Repair Café YouTube channel www.youtube.com/channel/UCkzO-v8mM-TeEf_dFqV5pCw

UK Funding for local waste reduction http://ciwm-journal.co.uk/funding-boost-councils-target-weee-reuse

Join the campaign against product obsolescence  www.rethink-it.org sign the petition and check out your product

DIY repair guides:

www.patagonia.com/worn-wear-repairs

www.wikihow.com/wikiHowTo?search=Repair

www.instructables.com/howto/repair

www.ifixit.com/Guide

 

Reduce, reuse, recycle www.epa.gov/recycle

20 Simple ways to live more lightly https://theconsciousvegan.wordpress.com/2017/07/07/20-small-ways-to-make-a-big-difference  [photo]

The forgotten R … repair https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2014/01/20/the-forgotten-r-reduce-reuse-recycle-and-repair 

 

 

List compiled August 2017 by Chris Lee. Royston Repair Café  www.facebook.com/RoystonRepairCafe

Thanks to Prof Martin Charter www.linkedin.com/in/martin-charter-frsa-6289097/?ppe=1           http://cfsd.org.uk/events/farnham_repair_cafe

Peace of mind

IMG_5194On my return from a free swim at our local leisure centre (ref recent blog http://bit.ly/1rFL6t0 ) I walked past a parked domestic appliances van. On the door it offered ‘peace of mind ‘ (for the price of a 2 or 5 year guarantee).

Companies have long known that people will pay for ‘peace of mind’ and they play on the opposite – anxiety about problems that might arise (but in reality may be very unlikely).

Only now are people waking up to the fact that paying for central heating breakdowns as/when they happen is usually cheaper than buying an annual care package. The exception to this might be our gas boiler which was installed over 20 years ago but has since been fitted with so many new parts – ‘for free’ under an annual care package – that it behaves like a young teenager (no jokes please about it going out at night and being slow to get started in the morning…)

I still remember when, 20 years ago, we went to buy a video player with our 3 year old daughter. The shop tried to persuade us to buy their now much-criticised ‘extended warranty’. Even now I can hear the salesman’s pitch “Imagine what would happen if your daughter posted a slice of buttered toast in the slot for videos …” It didn’t persuade us.

I’ve been thinking a lot about built-in obsolescence recently because we had our fourth Royston Repair Cafe last weekend. It was another great success in the fight against consumerism and encouragement to buy new rather than repair and re-use. To see what we got up to, go to www.facebook.com/RoystonRepairCafe.

Of course in reality we can never buy peace of mind; if it isn’t a domestic appliance breakdown, we’ll find other things to worry about. For me, peace of mind comes from feeling as though I’m in control – building mindfulness into my daily routines, ensuring I’m not instantly contactable for much of the day, and communicating as clearly and honestly as I can with those around me.