Tag Archives: running

Happy at home #11 – get active

The government is easing the lockdown – opening more shops and allowing gatherings that are socially-distanced. We’re all hoping that this doesn’t increase Coronavirus infection rates – something that some say we’ll not know for some weeks.

Understandably, many are getting impatient for this greater freedom – not least for our mental and physical health – but there’s lots you can do right now to keep fit and well.

And if you’re feeling tired during lockdown, you’re not alone – there are good reasons why you might be finding it hard to adjust  https://theconversation.com/here-is-why-you-might-be-feeling-tired-while-on-lockdown-135502. The good news is that exercise can help get over your fatigue

Get your body moving – indoors and out

Here are some great ideas for staying active at home https://www.mind.org.uk/about-us/our-policy-work/sport-physical-activity-and-mental-health/get-active-feel-good/staying-active-at-home

This is a great link to videos, tips and other useful sources to support your effort to keep on moving – whatever your situation https://www.greatersport.co.uk/ways-to-keep-moving

Workout from home

If all that activity hasn’t exhausted you, our friends at the Herts Sports Partnership have others ways you can ‘join the movement’ at home https://sportinherts.org.uk/workoutfromhome

Cycling

I understand a lot of people around the UK have taken to cycling in past weeks – while roads have been relatively free of traffic and the weather had been kind. It’s obviously a great way to get fresh air and exercise – and it’s not too late to get started!

This is the best single source I’ve found for information on all aspects of starting to cycle https://www.cyclinguk.org/advice-beginners

Or try Freegle for a bike that gives you the exercise but doesn’t take you anywhere!

Getting a free bike might be a little harder now than before the pandemic, but it’s worth signing up to your local online sharing sites. In Royston we’ve got Freegle https://www.ilovefreegle.org, Nextdoor https://nextdoor.co.uk and a local free exchange page on Facebook. Our local Recycling Centre (which has just reopened) had affordable bikes in different states of repair before the lockdown.

Before taking to the road, you’d do well to learn about bike maintenance – here are some tips  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TIlNAXU1kk and there are lots more tutorials on YouTube.

If you prefer two legs to two wheels…

Walking: They say that a 20-minute fast walk (one that leaves you feeling slightly out of breath) is pretty much as good for you as a run.

For all areas, here’s a useful source https://www.walkingforhealth.org.uk and to find walks near you, you can always go to the Walking Britain website walks finder https://www.walkingbritain.co.uk/find-walks-by-me.php

Running: If you need a bit of persuasion to even think about taking up running, read this  https://www.verywellfit.com/reasons-to-start-running-4022450. I love running because it’s cheap, I can do it from my door at any time, in any weather.

I won’t go on about parkrun – primarily because it’s been suspended during lockdown. But if you’re new to running, feeling a bit nervous, and you want to join a really friendly and supportive community of all ages and abilities (some people walk the 5kms route), you should check out your nearest parkrun for when lockdown is over https://www.parkrun.org.uk

Before then, you can check out this running guide for absolute beginners https://www.verywellfit.com/how-to-start-running-the-absolute-beginners-guide-2911191

Finally… feed the body and the brain

After all that physical exertion, why not reward yourself with a jacket potato? They’re cheap, easy to prepare, and healthy. I’ve just discovered 20 really tasty suggestions for fillings here https://www.goodtoknow.co.uk/food/recipe-collections/jacket-potato-fillings-28635

See other posts in this ‘Happy at home’ series here https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/category/happy-at-home

Being last, not fast

“There is more to life than increasing its speed” Mahatma Gandhi

My dear old dad hated school sports. He told me he was so determined not to come last in running races (he had standards…) that he once ended up in second place and was annoyed that he had to run again in another heat!

At the weekend I recalled my dad’s remark about not coming last when attending my local parkrun. I’ve written other blog posts about my love of parkrun – particularly that it’s about community rather than competition – but last Saturday’s experience was a first for me – I came last!

My time was 00.55.41 for the 5K – the slowest of 304 parkrunners – but that was all part of the plan as I was a ‘tail walker’. It involves making sure everyone returns safe and sound at the end of their run/walk/whatever. My hour-long walk around the route was a joy – very fresh air (a good blow in bright sunshine), great exercise in beautiful National Trust surroundings, and friendly chat – mainly with my co-tail walker who’s recovering from a hamstring injury. We talked about everything from sports injuries obviously, to dogs, caring duties, films, and the NHS.

It wasn’t quite a stroll in the park, but I was pleased there was no pressure (self-imposed or otherwise) to do other than finish the 5K circuit… last. I feel society is increasingly inclined to make us think that fast is desirable – that cramming more and more into our already busy lives is ‘a good thing’.

The idea of slowing things down is, of course, nothing new – the slow food movement in Italy dates back to the late 1980s https://www.slowfood.com.  I bought Carl Honore’s intriguing bestseller In Praise of Slow soon after it was published in 2004  https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Carl-Honore/In-Praise-of-Slow–How-a-Worldwide-Movement-is-Challengin/1980344 and I’d probably buy The Idler (a bi-monthly magazine for people who like to live in the slow lane https://www.idler.co.uk) if I had time to read it.

On a similar theme, if there was a competition for firing up your laptop, mine would probably come last. Every time I sit there after switching on my computer, I’m reminded of an early marketing database I used which allowed me time enough to make a cup of tea while it was selecting records from a list of 10,000 book-buyers. Fast forward three decades and, for all my impatience while waiting to use my computer, I’m grateful for the enforced delay as an opportunity for some mindful reflection at the beginning on the working day.

To coincide with its 15th anniversary, parkrun-UK commissioned some research  https://blog.parkrun.com/uk/2019/10/05/not-just-run-park. Two findings particularly interested me – firstly, that volunteering at parkrun was found to be better for our health and well-being than just running or walking the 5K. Interestingly the role of tail walker has been renamed in recent years – it used to be ‘tail runner’ – and this relates to a second research finding; that the average time for the 5K circuit had increased year-on-year – reflecting the growing number of people taking up parkrun (and running?) for the first time.

Looking more widely at slowing down society I don’t think I’m inclined to start a ‘come last’ campaign, but anything we can do to find more flexible ways of working (I’m right behind the campaign for a four day working week https://www.4dayweek.co.uk ) and to reduce the pressure on the next generation, is to be welcomed as a route to improved well-being.

Related blog posts:

https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2017/08/16/counting-what-counts

https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2019/06/01/coming-from-behind

https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2019/07/29/my-four-day-weekend

Running Repairs

I was thinking about the phrase ‘running repairs’ this weekend while marshaling at Wimpole parkrun (no virtue signalling intended). You know how some TV and radio programmes – To Hull and Back springs to mind – sound like they’ve thought of the title first and then developed the idea behind the title; well, this could be the case with the idea of Running Repairs.

The phrase combines two of my passions – getting free exercise and giving free fixes – which got me thinking… What if runners with relevant skills could be matched with local residents with things that needed fixing. This could be a lightbulb or fuse to be changed, a dripping tap, a button that needs sewing back on, a bike chain that needs adjusting, anything that needs lubricating, gluing or cleaning – the list goes on. It would be a free, non-emergency, accessible service, but only for small jobs; you wouldn’t want to put professional handy-people and repairers out of business.

The idea is not wholly original – some readers may know about GoodGym a brilliant national initiative which brings groups of runners together to do ‘good work’ in their community. They run to locations to do this – for example to do a litter pick in a local park or a village hall to paint a room. They also support older individuals with small tasks and companionship. Nor is free community repair a novelty – we’ve been running a quarterly Repair Café in Royston for the past six years.

Why the ‘running repairs’ idea is a bit different from a community event is that the interaction with residents is 1-2-1 in their homes, and the fixes would tend to be for people who, for one reason or another, can’t attend a community event (and you can’t bring in a dripping tap or light socket…)

So, an idea to combine keeping bodies and things working well, connecting communities and creating friendships along the way – good for people and the planet. What do you think – has ‘Running Repairs’ got, er… legs?  Please let me know.

https://www.goodgym.org

www.facebook.com/RoystonRepairCafe

My love affair with running

Last Saturday I ran my 100th parkrun. No big deal in itself – there are parkrunners who have gone well beyond the 250 mark and many who are much older than me – but I celebrated with a beer all the same. I’m not competitive, but my aim each Saturday I run is to be in the top third of all runners, in the top five for my age group, and to finish under 26 minutes. I’m pleased to report that last Saturday I achieved all three.

The magic that is the parkrun family and all it stands for (thank you Wimpole parkrun where I’ve run 65 of the 100) is just one of the reasons for my love of running. When I joined parkrun I was told ‘it’s not about the running, it’s about community’ – that says it all.

Next month is the sixth anniversary of my relationship with parkrun, but that’s just the last 6 years of almost exactly twenty years of on and off road-running. Just to be clear, my relationship with running has been solid for the past two decades (I’ve fairly consistently kept up four runs a week, excluding holidays) it’s the running surface that’s been on-and-off.

Like many, I started running for my health – in my case it was living with mental ill health and, while running wasn’t the ‘magic bullet’, it did get me out of bed when other prospects in those dark days were far less inviting. I was introduced to running by someone far better than I – he paid the price for his obsession and has since turned to successful race walking, which puts less demands on his knees.

There are objective reasons why running is ‘a good thing’ – uplifting our spirits when we’re feeling low and keeping our bodies working better (knees notwithstanding) for longer. It’s low-cost (only the price of a pair of decent trainers) and convenient – I can run any time of day or night on any day of the year – and I do! It takes you places you might never go and starts conversations with friends and fellow runners that would otherwise remain unspoken. On one particular run, many years ago, five of us talked about everything from God to guinea pigs in the space of ten miles!

When running alone I use my time for thinking freely, or doing the opposite. I often take out a problem I’m wrestling with and, by the time I get home, it either doesn’t seem so bad or I’ve sorted out something completely different. Some great ideas come when I run (well, I think they’re good, but many don’t seem so when I’ve warmed down). Then there’s my mindful running; identifying the sounds I can hear around me; focusing on how I’m feeling as the run develops (a bodyscan); or just concentrating on the metre ahead of me – striding with purpose, oblivious to pretty much everything else around me – the secret of some of my best parkrun times.

Of course, it’s easy to get sentimental about something you love. It probably won’t sound sincere from me, so I urge you to read Running Free by fellrunner Richard Askwith. The book’s sub-title is A runner’s journey back to nature and, to quote the publicity blurb: Not convinced running had to be all about pounding pavements, buying fancy kit and racking up extreme challenges, [Richard Askwith] looked for ways to liberate himself. His solution: running through muddy fields and up rocky fells, running with his dog at dawn, running because he’s being (voluntarily) chased by a pack of bloodhounds, running to get hopelessly, enjoyably lost, running fast for the sheer thrill of it…. Running Free is about getting back to the basics of why we love to run”

https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Richard-Askwith/Running-Free–A-Runners-Journey-Back-to-Nature/16498647 (order online through Hive and you support local bookshops)

For my other ‘love affairs’ in this series, go to https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/category/my-love-affair-with

Birkenhead revisited – no man’s land #7  

 

Reflections on masculinity, mental health and trying to make a difference 

I believe Birkenhead has always suffered from being just across the Mersey from Liverpool – with the Beatles, scousers and two top football team. In contrast, Birkenhead doesn’t often hit the headlines and, when it does, it can be for the wrong reasons.

But unlike Liverpool, Birkenhead can boast that it’s on the Wirral. Yes, ‘the’ Wirral because it’s short for the Wirral peninsula – the bulge across the water from Liverpool that’s bordered on three sides by the rivers Mersey and Dee and the Irish Sea. Then there’s the debate about whether its ‘in’ or ‘on’ the Wirral. In 2014, an online poll of Liverpool Echo readers showed that 73% of respondents would use the phrase “on the Wirral” in everyday conversation, as opposed to “in the Wirral” or “in Wirral”.

I was intrigued to see a recent piece in a national newspaper hailing some famous people from the Wirral, with one from Birkenhead. Half, in fact, were not from the Wirral. War poet Wilfred Owen is from Oswestry (not the Wirral), actor Daniel Craig is from Chester (not the Wirral). The late great John Peel was from Heswall on the Wirral, and Jodie Taylor (England and ex-Tranmere Rovers footballer) is a Birkonian!

And I am/was also a Birkonian. For the first 15 years of my life when I wasn’t away at boarding school I lived in Birkenhead. I have happy memories of those years, but have never really felt I belonged there. Despite return visits for family gatherings, including funerals, I’ve never thought I’d live there again. Of course, if the family business had survived I might have been destined for a career in textiles and my life would, undoubtedly, have turned out very differently.

If you don’t know Birkenhead, enough to say my mum said she spent 50 years trying to get away from the place; she used to say you never meet people going to Birkenhead – they have always come from there. To mis-quote comedian Sue Perkins “Birkenhead is less a place, more the punchline for a joke.”

But like the Therfield Heath jewel in Royston’s crown, Birkenhead has its own gemstone – Birkenhead Park – and with it, a place in the record books. I can do no better than the description by Bill Bryson (yes – him again) so I won’t try. It is a typical large Victorian City park, with playgrounds and playing fields, some woodlands, a picturesque lake with a boathouse and rustic bridge… It was a pleasant, wholly conventional urban park on a Sunday morning, but Birkenhead has one special feature; it is the oldest urban park in the world… purpose-built for the amusement of all people.

If Bill Bryson had visited the park on a Saturday morning he might have witnessed Birkenhead parkrun (yes, it’s a lower case ‘p’) – with over 300 runners lapping the park three times from 9am every week at vastly different speeds since July 2015.

Such public access and enjoyment would have delighted American journalist turned landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted who, as Bill Bryson relates, built more than 100 parks across North America.

Olmsted’s most famous design was Central Park in New York – as Bob Harrison, a Birkenhead parkrunner, was proud to remind me when we bumped into each other (not literally) at Wimpole parkrun in south Cambridgeshire. Wimpole, a National Trust estate, is my local parkrun. As readers of an earlier blog in this ‘No Man’s Land’ series may remember, I spent 9 months of my life trying to set up a Royston parkrun on Therfield Heath but finally ran into a brick wall in the shape of the Heath Conservators (capital ‘H’, capital ‘C’)

Despite the appeal of Birkenhead Park, the Fab Four and various boyfriends, I think it’s fair to say that my three older sisters, like me, have never felt inclined to move back there, suggesting their sense of belonging was no stronger than mine. And my sisters went through primary and secondary education in the town so they had the opportunity to build even stronger ties.

Unlike my sisters, my  exam results weren’t good enough for a free place in a local independent school so, when the possibility of going to a single sex boarding school in York came along, it seemed like the obvious thing to do. Getting away from girls, the extra help with my studies and, above all, making a canoe – I grabbed the opportunity with both hands.

It would be churlish to criticise my parents for doing what they thought was best for their youngest child, but I now believe my secondary schooling had a massive, and not entirely positive, effect on the rest of my life.

For a well-observed and funny portrayal of Birkenhead, listen to Mark Steel’s in Town – Birkenhead https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pEgPktmj9Tg 

For other blogs in the ‘No man’s land’ series click here https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/category/no-mans-land

Counting what counts

Last Friday I found myself staring at a quotation on a hotel wall at 7.30am. I was about to enjoy a community breakfast meeting that I attend each month at the same hotel. I’ve seen the quote many times before and I like it almost as much as a full English breakfast, even though it’s widely mis-attributed (including by the hotel) to Albert Einstein.

The correct attribution for ‘Not everything that can be counted counts and not everything that counts can be counted’ appears to be William Bruce Cameron. The first reference found is as recent as 1986, but that was 30 years after Einstein’s death in 1955. That doesn’t matter to me – it’s the insight I value – but I expect it would bother Cameron.

A day after re-admiring the quote, I had its significance confirmed at parkrun – a free timed 5 kilometres run involving over 1 million runners of all ages and abilities across the UK every Saturday morning at 9am, not to mention a vast army of volunteer marshals. The big thing for me about parkrun is (apart from it being independent of government and the 2012 Olympic legacy) that, as is always emphasised, it’s a run not a race.

We’re also told that parkrun is all about community – everyone supporting each other – it’s not about the running. But last Saturday for the first time in four years and 64 parkruns I forgot to take my barcode – essential for getting a time for my run. In my 15 + years of off-road running I’ve only run competitively on three occasions – I run for fun, not to compete with myself or anyone else. So, I was taken aback by my reaction to discovering (after my 5K run) that the time wouldn’t appear on my personal parkrun profile.

I was surprised to be bothered about not being able to get my parkrun time, although I think it was as much annoyance about my own forgetfulness. Then I remembered that William Cameron quote and I realised that what really mattered was running around a beautiful National Trust estate on a sunny Saturday morning in August with 350 lovely parkrunners.

More on measurement https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2014/05/08/measure-what-matters

Discover parkrun at www.parkrun.org.uk