Tag Archives: sharing

Slow fashion

My work colleague is off to buy a prom dress with her daughter. If you know anything about my colleague and proms (I don’t mean the musicfest at the Albert Hall each year) you’ll know the dress is for her daughter.

I don’t know the history of the school prom in this country (it probably originates from the USA) but it’s a semi-formal post-exam celebration for secondary school students. Wikipedia says it’s a shortened version of Promenade Dance. For the girls or, more likely their parents, it can cost £££ for the prom dress and, as my colleague pointed out the other day,       ‘all the other stuff’.

I suspect most prom dresses are only worn once; an extreme example of the worst waste of the ‘fast fashion’ industry. (Incidentally, did you know the average DIY power drill is used for only 13 minutes of its life?) Given that the younger generation seem to be more in tune with the climate emergency than their parents, it’ll be interesting to see if there’s any downturn in the (new) prom dress market in the coming years. I’d like to think that campaigns are slowing fashion, alongside the emerging range of alternatives to excessive spending on clothes – renting, sharing, upcycling, donating – making secondhand, pre-loved, vintage (chose your own adjective) clothes not only acceptable, but desirable.

At the high-end of the re-worn clothing market is Wardrobe HQ – a luxury fashion rental and resale website. I say ‘high-end’ and your rented designer coat could still set you back £295 for a week, and a sequinned bodycon (whatever that means!) mini could cost you a maxi £215.

Interviewed in the Guardian newspaper, Wardrobe HQ Chair Jane Shepherdson is quoted as saying the idea of clothing rental is particularly appropriate for luxury womenswear, with ski-wear, occasion wear, maternity wear and kids-wear other areas ripe for rental. Personally, I think she’s got that the wrong way around; maternity wear and kids-wear should come first as it affects so many more people. But then maybe I’m looking at this through an environmental/community lens rather than a commercial one.

A similar but much more affordable clothing option that’s geographically and conceptually much closer to my heart is Nuw. Based in Cambridge, Nuw describes itself as a clothes-sharing app and community; they’re all about sharing, not renting. I met the people behind Nuw at a Swish (clothing exchange event) in Cambridge and they seemed to have their hearts and heads in the right place.

In the west country, the fine folk of Frome in Somerset have taken the community clothes exchange concept a step further. The Frome Wardrobe Collective organise swapping events, but also have a small ‘community wardrobe’ in a converted public toilet (a case of deja loo?) alongside their community fridge and larder – the first such fridge in the UK when it was set up more than two years ago. From 8am to 8pm people can leave their ‘occasion clothes’ for others to borrow.

Closer to home, Circular Cambridge are promoting slow fashion through discussions and events, including a festival and Swishes. Swishes are volunteer-run and usually free and tend to feature women’s and children’s wear (the only man I know who’s into secondhand clothing does his shopping for designer items in charity shops in posh places). Circular Cambridge also organise Repair Cafes and more often than not these include sewing and mending facilities as part of their free offer – anyone for a bit of upcycling?

Not forgetting community exchange platforms such as Freegle (many localities also have Facebook groups for local exchange or sale of pre-loved items) and charity shops are another great source of affordable clothes.

I’m sure I won’t have to persuade my colleague about considering these alternatives to prom-dress-buying – a way to save money and the planet. I suspect that convincing her daughter might be somewhat harder…

https://www.mywardrobehq.com

https://www.thenuwardrobe.com

https://edventurefrome.org/enterprises-initiatives/frome-wardrobe-collective

http://circularcambridge.org/category/blog/fashion

http://www.getswishing.com

https://www.ilovefreegle.org

Sharing, repairing, re-using in Royston*

There really is no planet B, so now is the time to join millions of others locally, nationally and internationally helping to tackle our climate emergency by cutting waste. The scale of the problem is mind-boggling; every week in the UK 11 million items of clothing go to landfill; that’s an annual total equal to the weight of New York’s Empire State Building. The average household owns £4,000 worth of clothing, 30% of which has not been worn in the past year. Estimates put the value of this unused clothing at around £30 billion. Time to get swishing!

Think global, act local

For many, a barrier to taking that first step to conserve resources and reduce waste is a sense of helplessness – not knowing where to start and, perhaps, feeling the problems are too immense for individuals to make a real difference. But there are ‘quick wins’ to be made (see link at the bottom of this piece) and you are not alone; a number of local initiatives are already demonstrating practical, creative (and fun!) ways to consume less and keep items out of landfill, not just in Royston but around the world.

Say yes to less – share

For nearly 15 years, and without spending a penny, the Royston Recycle online platform promoted and enabled the free exchange (freecycling) of unwanted items – from children’s toys and equipment, to household items, garden tools and musical instruments.  Between December 2004 and December 2019, over 7500 members in and around Royston posted 97,000 ‘offers’ and ‘wants’ keeping an estimated 45,000 items in use for longer.

Don’t despair – repair! 

An offspring of the Royston freecycling initiative is Royston Repair Cafe – a series of free community repair events held every three months to keep items in use for longer. Owners of broken items have discovered ‘the joy of fix’ and, since February 2014, volunteer repairers have mended over 50% of the 640 items brought in for free assessment. Everything from clothes and books to bikes and electrical equipment have been given a new lease of life to the delight of their owners – saving their money and the planet.

Creative ways to re-use materials

When it comes to crafting someone else’s waste materials into one-off additions to homes and gardens, the new kid on the block (although the two guys behind it could hardly be described as ‘new kids’!) is Green & Grey. Using mainly pallet wood (but not averse to working with driftwood, wellington boots and bike parts) the pair are using their interest in ‘making stuff’ from reclaimed materials to promote the value of original hand-made items in our increasingly mass-produced consumer society.

An even newer kid on the ‘zero waste’ block is a Royston resident’s Anahata initiative promoting and selling planet-friendly plastic-free produced and packaged products. I can recommend the shaving soap.

From sharing, repairing and reusing, to recycling. Terracycle – an international recycling company – have teamed up with residents in and around Royston to support their efforts to recycle ‘difficult materials’ – including soft plastics, toothbrushes and crisp packets. A growing number of collections points around town help raise money for charities when you make the extra effort to protect our planet for generations to come

Contacts and further information

Sustainable living https://www.asustainablelife.co.uk (Including quick wins to sustainability https://www.asustainablelife.co.uk/12-quick-sustainable-wins)

Royston Repair Café www.facebook.com/RoystonRepairCafe

Green & Grey https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/about

Anahata www.facebook.com/Anahata.Planet

Terracycle  https://www.royston-crow.co.uk/news/new-recycling-options-for-royston-residents-1-6194192

Circular Cambridge http://circularcambridge.org

Swishing http://www.getswishing.com

*This blog post is adapted from one which first appeared on The Listing magazine website in September 2019  in the ‘Hidden Royston’ series  http://www.thelistingmagazine.co.uk/category/community-news/hiddenroyston

Gifting for our time

Today [Saturday 7 December] is Small Business Saturday. Since this always falls at the weekend, the most active way to show your support on the day is to go shopping and make sure you use independents wherever you can. I was out and about in our town centre and bought some bolts from our brilliant hardware store (I’m making a pallet wood bike ramp with a young lad), a jar of local honey from a market stall will make a great Christmas gift, and we enjoyed a pint in a High Street pub ( it was thirsty work!)

But thoughtful buying and gifting is not just for one day or just at Christmas time. As consumers we can make giving and spending decisions that are more or less ethical and environmental – we have the choice. Just as I chose to buy nothing on Black Friday and refuse to use Amazon (do you know about Hive – they support local bookshops). It’s also why I have a little library outside my house – I love books but also want to promote concepts of sharing and second-hand consumption.

Research by the Charities Aid Foundation around Christmas 2018 found that 44% of adults would rather have fewer gifts and see money diverted to a good cause. Last Christmas, a Mintel report also found that 29% of gift buyers bought presents with a lower environmental impact, and 65% said retailers should make more of an effort to promote gifts that generate less waste.

On which subject – environmental consumption, I recently discovered the wonderful graphic above via the Just Little Changes website. It’s self-explanatory, so what are you waiting for?! Let’s make giving meaningful and redefine the value of a gift.

And while you’re at it, why not wrap your presents in newspaper? A sheet with colour photos and interesting headlines is a great discussion starter and makes a serious point about saving money and the planet that might just last beyond Boxing Day.

Sources and useful information:

https://www.npr.org/2019/12/04/784702588/the-best-thing-you-can-do-is-not-buy-more-stuff-says-secondhand-expert

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/nov/22/black-friday-consumption-killing-planet-growth 

https://justlittlechanges.com

http://www.buynothingday.co.uk

https://www.hive.co.uk

https://smallbusinesssaturdayuk.com