Tag Archives: sustainability

Working well at home – some resources

I started drafting this blog post some time ago and then, of course, the Coronavirus struck – not me, but… well… everything else! I had to go away and rethink what content might be most useful during the current lock-down.

There’s small comfort coming out of Government for small businesses and self-employed people – I know some are ill-able to wait while the promised financial support comes through. For what’s (meant to be) available, this summary from my friends at Enterprise Nation may be useful https://www.enterprisenation.com/learn-something/small-business-coronavirus-support-budget.

There’s lots of non-financial support around and, personally, I think it’s a matter of identifying just one of two reliable sources to avoid information overload! Below I’ve highlighted a couple of items I’ve spotted recently:

Are you sitting comfortably? https://www.wired.co.uk/article/working-from-home-posture-back-pain?

If you’re running a business from home  https://www.startupdonut.co.uk/hub/coronavirus-business-help

Free upcoming ‘lunch and learn’ webinars for small businesses https://www.enterprisenation.com/coronavirus-support/online-events

5 work from home tips https://www.hubbub.org.uk/5-work-from-home-tips

Being connected https://www.techdonut.co.uk/blog/20/02/your-complete-guide-to-business-connectivity

Advice from ACAS on rights and responsibilities  https://www.acas.org.uk/working-from-home

Here are a couple of items around sustaining your wellbeing in the current climate….

https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/publications/looking-after-your-mental-health-during-coronavirus-outbreak

https://mentalhealth.org.uk/coronavirus/staying-at-home?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-51873799

At a more personal level, I hope you’re discovering ‘what works for you’ while staying at home. Most people I’ve spoken to find some sort of routine helpful, but I also try to build in some differences as well, otherwise one day is very much like another.

I find purposeful activity (such as combining a bit of shopping with a longer-than-normal walk) also rewarding. It’s also a good idea to focus on what you can control and avoid the rest.

For loads more resources to support small businesses, check out https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/free-lunch-business-support

Go well, work well, and stay safe

Now you have no excuse – review article

I’ve followed Jen Gale’s wise words on being green since, what I’ve recently learnt, was her first public-speaking engagement – a TEDx talk in Bedford in July 2013 which she describes as ‘terrifying’. I was part of the group organising the TEDx event and as well as introducing me to Jen, it also sparked an ongoing interest in TEDx events around the East of England (including speaking at one of them which, I can confirm, is terrifying!)

As well as an interest in TEDx Talks and sustainable living, I also have a passion for real books (for details check out a blog post in the ‘My love affair with…’ series). This interest includes 15 years in book marketing and sales and explains my addiction to buying printed books, some of which end up in the Little Library outside our house. So, when I saw that Jen Gale had written The Sustainable(ish) Living Guide I couldn’t resist being consumer(ish) and I bought a copy.

Being a grumpy old pedant, I notice it’s not printed on recycled paper, but it’s ‘responsibly sourced’ and, since I refuse to read e-books, that has to be good enough. If you don’t know already, you’ll soon learn that trying to ‘do the right thing’ when it comes to behaving sustainably it’s often not straight forward. Try looking at the relevant carbon footprints of plastic, paper and cotton bags.

What I like about the Sustainable(ish) Living Guide is that it doesn’t pretend there are easy answers, but it does address the common concerns that I suspect many of us share. To quote from the book’s introduction… ‘This is for you if you’re worried about the state of the planet, but you’re just not sure where to start or what to do… It’s for you if you feel a kind of low-level guilt about the things you do every day, knowing that there is a better way, but you’re up to your eyes in work and family and life stuff, and it doesn’t feel like there’s the time or energy to make big changes.’

But here’s the good news – all effort, however small, is worthwhile and Jen Gale’s guide provides an abundance of (jargon alert) quick-wins that won’t involve a radical change to the way you live nor having to find more hours in the day to make an impact.

And she doesn’t just cover day-to-day living. My love of books attracted me to one idea for an alternative advent calendar – involving books – and, similarly, Jen’s ideas for more ethical Valentine’s Day presents reminded me about the idea of giving family and friends ‘a blind date with a book’, bought from a charity shop and wrapped (in newspaper of course).

Charity shops cropped up again in a section about how many donations, however well-intentioned, end up in landfill because clothes are unwearable or toys and equipment are broken. This got me thinking… could volunteer repairers in Repair Cafes (also commended in the book) team up with local charity shops to fix donated items – increasing income to those charities and, of course, saving stuff from landfill. So, the book has already helped me make connections!

If this book does nothing else, I think it gives the reader hope, and ideas, and some answers. What is comes down to is that each one of us is personally more powerful than we might imagine. And it’s not all about costing more; many of the actions to save the planet can actually save us money. When we do have to spend, we have choices about where and how we do this. We have no local bookshop where I live, but by buying The Sustainable(ish) Living Guide online from Hive Books, I support a company that pays it’s taxes and gives a share of the purchase price to my nominated independent bookshop.

My make do and mend year – Jen Gale TEDx Talk  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCm7aBM7EeY

Buy the book https://www.hive.co.uk/Product/Jen-Gale/The-Sustainableish-Living-Guide–Everything-You-Need-to-K/23879824

Visit the website https://www.asustainablelife.co.uk

RIP – Re-use In Practice

On 14 December 2019, almost 15 years to the day since  starting it, we closed Royston Recycle – our local freecycling group*. The reason for this was quite simple – hosts Yahoo reduced their functionality, so our online group couldn’t, er…function. GDPR considerations notwithstanding, it was not feasible to ‘migrate’ (to coin a dreaded Universal Credit phrase) our members to a new site and, anyway, there are now alternative local free-exchange platforms to join.

The aim of freecycle/freegle** is simple – the free exchange of unwanted items to keep them out of landfill and in use for longer. That core objective directed our moderation of the site for the 15 years – set up with techy support from Dermot for many years; a role continued by Andy until this month’s close-down. But it did so much more than just reducing waste; locally it spawned a new initiative – Royston Repair Café – and it inspired personal friendships between people with a common cause.

Ultimately, the success of the site in meeting its aim has been down to the active and responsible  participation of its members. Co-founder Dermot was keen that the site should, as far as possible, be self-moderating, with few rules beyond ensuring items on offer and requests were ‘legal decent and honest’. We had to intervene once or twice over live animals (discouraged but not actually banned, and I learnt that re-homing frog spawn is discouraged by wildlife groups). The lack of rules was a problem for some. We knew that some members would get stuff free online and then sell it on via boot sales or selling sites. While people would complain about this apparent abuse of people’s goodwill, it wasn’t, in fact, against the rules. The big thing was that giving and taking had to be free of any exchange of money (‘the clue’s in the name’ we’d say ‘free-cycle’) but sometimes people would try to make a charge for delivery or ask for a donation to charity – both, however reasonable, against the rules.

Trust and mutual respect were an important part of the relationship between members of the group – we only rarely ‘advised’ particular people about the rules (this usually amounted to a verbal warning or putting them on moderation) when evidence had built up. More often than not the problem resolved itself; friendly reminders to the whole group were usually enough to get things back on track.

I always describe Royston Recycle as the most sustainable community initiative I’ve ever been part of. We spent no money on it, we never had a planning meeting, we attracted 7500 members through word-of-mouth. Since 2004 those members have posted 97,000 ‘offers’ and ‘wants’ keeping an estimated 45,000 items out of landfill.

In our increasingly materialistic and seemingly divided world, it’s been heartening to see people willing to give without expecting anything in return. I’ll never forget when, following a post from someone who’d been thrown out of their house, members piled in with offers of bedding, small pieces of furniture, and even a tabletop cooker.  I was always delighted when items, particularly for children – toys, clothes, pushchairs – circulated many times around the group, multiplying value for so many and saving the planet for the benefit of all.

I often quote a memorable experience from my own use of the Royston Recycle group. One Sunday morning my daughter asked if I’d buy her a clarinet on e-Bay. ‘No’ I said, ‘but I’ll post a request on freecycle’. The post went up at midday and by 6pm that same Sunday, my daughter had gratefully collected a clarinet from a local member and had an offer of a free lesson!

Although my other half always reminds me we need to get rid of stuff not acquire it, I have rarely been disappointed when posting requests for ‘odd items’ to do with my re-purposing/ upcycling projects – mirrors, brush heads, and clock mechanisms being just three examples.

Talking of odd requests’, one stands out above all others. The woman posting the ‘want’ later reflected that she might have asked the moderation team before she posted the request. And we agreed – it did generate a lot of complaints. Whether she fancied herself as a second Damian Hirst, I don’t know, but her request for a dead horse didn’t go down well. I think it was for an art project, and we never found out whether she got one!

So farewell Royston Recycle – you have served us and the planet well. Long live re-use!

*Royston Recycle would have been called Royston Freecycle but for an error at the registration stage. This mistake proved to be fortuitous when, some years later, the founder of Freecycle in the USA tried to ‘stake a claim’ in each local group. We refused his demands and simply had to remove any freecycle branding without needing to change our name.

**Freegle is the UK version of freecycle – started in response to the attempted north American takeover.

Also reducing waste in Royston area…

Royston Repair Cafe http://www.facebook.com/RoystonRepairCafe

Royston Free and For Sale Facebook Group  – https://www.facebook.com/groups/roystonfreeorforsale  [The local moderators of this group points out they allows things to be both given away for free and sold. Items given away may be later resold]

Royston Freegle group – https://www.ilovefreegle.org/explore/Royston-Freegle [The moderation team for this group are based in Stevenage. This group is only for rehoming items without any money changing hands]

Trash Nothing – Not so much a group but an easy way of interacting with a number of different freecycling/recycling groups https://trashnothing.com

Age and social entrepreneurship

An image of ageThe clock is ticking. Not the ‘Help – I’m 60 in August and what have I got to show for it?’ kind of countdown. No, the clock is ticking because we’re four months into a 12-month Repair Shed programme funded by the Innovation in Waste Prevention Fund. By definition ‘innovation’ is unlikely to follow a neatly drawn plan, but I still feel pressure when reality gets in the way of our best intentions.

I’ve been documenting our progress since way before the funding came on stream (not least through these blogs) and I currently report weekly by e-mail to all our Shed members, monthly by phone to the funders, and formally face-to-face to our Steering Group every six weeks. I think this urge to document my progress, and lessons learnt along the way, is a function of my age and stage in life – I want to leave behind something, even if it’s only a list of mistakes; things I’d do differently next time around.

But what I haven’t been reflecting and reporting on is what it means to be trying to set up a social enterprise in my late 50’s. Until now nobody has asked me about this, maybe because they think it would be politically incorrect (age still seems to be a taboo subject for some). But now I’m meeting an MA student of social entrepreneurship researching social enterprise start-ups by people in the 50+ age group, so I’m trying to draw some conclusions about my age-related experiences.

It isn’t going to be easy because I’ve never thought of myself as being a particular age and, even if I did, I wouldn’t know how someone of that age would/should behave! What I do know is this….

My younger self would have advised me not to even consider starting a social enterprise because it’s such a difficult business model to sustain financially. It’s certainly not a level playing field … social enterprises tend to employ people deemed to be unemployable, locate in places others don’t go, and provide products and services others won’t. And why don’t other businesses do this? Because it won’t make them any money or, at the very least, it will involve an uphill struggle just to get to the starting line alongside ‘straight’ businesses. Mix in the ‘triple bottom line’ – measuring performance against people, planet and profit related objectives – and the challenge becomes even greater.

So the drive to take this difficult route to business success at my age and stage in life comes from personal experience – overriding objectivity and business sense.  Just as charitable giving is often prompted by a personal connection with the cause being supported, so my involvement in setting up The Repair Shed is fuelled by an empathy for, and association with, the purpose behind the enterprise – to keep men aged 50+ healthier and happier for longer. I’m in the age group of my target market and I’d certainly have liked to have access to a Repair Shed at different stages in my life to help me through unemployment and mental ill health.

Whether my age and experience make me more credible to others is not for me to say – you need to ask them! I’m keen to avoid the cliché of equating age and experience with wisdom, but I have been around, I’ve built up contacts, and I invite contemporaries to bring their age and experience to the development of the enterprise as well.

I know I have the p-word – passion – and the energy to give the development of The Repair Shed vision my best shot, but I also feel that is tempered by a sense of realism and a self-awareness about my own limitations (managing people being one!) I don’t know whether this is a good or bad thing – boundless optimism can sometimes make things happen.

This more cautious approach to enterprise development may also affect my rate of progress but I’m not convinced this is a function of age. Certainly everything had taken far longer than I had planned and other, high-tech start-ups seem to develop much more quickly. In comparison, our operation is much lower tech (not all members are on e-mail for a start) and I’m the only person getting paid for the time I put in on developing the business.

With age, I suspect you don’t get so easily seduced by the hype around social entrepreneurship and social enterprises – a subject about which I’ve written other blogs. Suffice it to say that I don’t see this development stage in my career as being a route to fame and fortune! A life in the not-for-private-profit sector has taught me that the return on investment of blood, sweat and tears is the personal satisfaction, if I’m lucky, of seeing how people benefit from what I’ve created and leaving a sustainable set-up for others to develop and improve. Which would require a whole new blog to define ‘sustainability’…

Further reading:

For blogs on slowing the spin around social entrepreneurs and social enterprise, go to https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2013/12/21/slowing-the-spin-about-social-entrepreneurs  and https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2014/03/28/slowing-the-spin-about-social-enterprise

Enterprise essential – make the physical environment your business

Social enterprise is about environmental sustainability as well financial viability. Whether its travel to meetings, the conservation of energy in your office, or the re-use and recycling of equipment, we can all play our part in demonstrating how social enterprise can be a better way of doing business.

 

Enterprise essential – Affordable services can exclude more people than they include

Professor Ian Bruce of the Centre for Charity Effectiveness points out that if you price too low to ensure affordability for all, and then go out of business, nobody benefits. When everyone pays something, however little, everyone has an interest in your success.