Tag Archives: upcycling

Green and Grey Repurpose – MeTubes

tab-tube-2Question – what do a pencil, toothbrush, and phone charger have in common?               Answer – calcium tablets.

I’ve been prescribed calcium tablets for osteoporosis (well, against osteoporosis to be more precise). I’m meant to be taking 60 every month for five years. That’s a tube-a-week habit so I’m accumulating a goodly supply of empty plastic tubes with plastic plugs in the end.

Not wanting to waste the NHS’s investment in these tubes (and my health), I’ve set out to devise as many re-purposing ideas for them as I can. Here are the first three (I have some others in development using combinations of tubes – watch this space)

  • img_0020Brushguard – after hearing about potential health hazards on hotel bathroom sinks, I set to work producing a cover for the average toothbush. It works well in a washbag and can be secured upright to a smooth surface in the bathroom using the sucker on the end.
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  • Sharpenhold – big enough to store a couple of short pencils – the kind you find in Ikea, Screwfix and Wickes (see my blog on the value of short pencils – link below) You can also keep your shavings under control and your pencils sharp. Yes – real writing can come in small sustainable containers!
  • img_0016-2The leader – twist the plug to reduce or release the lead between your charging phone and the wall socket. No more tangles, no tripping over a trailing lead, no more people confusing your charger for theirs.

All tubes can be painted for identification, so you don’t try to brush your teeth with a pencil, for personalisation, and to coordinate with your bathroom, office, and phone-cover colour schemes.

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Your turn…

Share your own re-purposing ideas and let’s see if we can come up with “101 uses for an empty tablet tube” I’ll send you (within the UK) three tubes with plugs if you submit an idea with a brief explanation (and preferably a drawing or photo).

Also of interest?

https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/category/green-grey-repurpose/

https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2014/10/30/pencils-and-personalisation

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Green and Grey Repurpose – Soap Sock

My mum used to complain “nothing gets better, it only gets worse”. That may make her sound like a pessimist but she wasn’t; she was a lifelong Liberal (and reluctantly a Lib Dem) so she knew all about living hopefully.

I was thinking that paid-for car-washing was going the same way – paying more for an automated and inferior job. Then Eastern European migrant workers came over to wash and polish our cars within an inch of their lives – reviving the fashion for hand-washes.

To encourage this trend for hand-car-washing, I’m kicking off this new series of blogs on re-purposing and hacking, with a new use for an unwanted item of clothing.

img_0012What do you do with a single holey sock that’s beyond darning but too good to throw out? You can turn it into a Soap Sock for cleaning and polishing – cars, cutlery, candlesticks, and other things beginning with ‘c’.

The woolier the sock the better – old bed socks and slipper socks are ideal, woollen walking socks come close, but any holey, wooly sock will do. Ankle socks work better img_0014than stockings but the longer sock can be doubled over if necessary making your soap sock even more absorbent.

Try the sock for size – it should  fit over your hand … like a glove. If it’s a bit loose around your wrist you can keep it in place with one of the rubber bands that posties drop around your front door.                                                                                       img_0020Using your soap sock is easy. For a car wash, you slip the sock over your hand, plunge both into a bucket of hot ‘wash and wax’ water, then caress the body (of the car) as if exfoliating your own contours. Be sure not to miss those awkward little nooks and crannies – particularly around the wheel hubs.

img_0022If washing other surfaces, you can tuck some of those annoying left over slivers of hand soap inside your sock ,so it lathers from within when you dip your hand into the clean water. For polishing jobs, slipper socks work well inside out.

A final tip, if you’re cleaning a tiled/vinyl floor, you can wear two soap socks and shuffle around the room without needing to bend down – my kind of housework.

An afterthought – washing your car is a good opportunity to say ‘hello’ to passers-by and for getting to know your neighbours – even better if you offer to wash their car as well…

Further reading:  https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2016/12/31/whats-the-purpose  

 

What’s the purpose?

finger-fun-with-forks

Finger fun with forks

A repairer at our local Repair Café recently told me that the back brace of a windscreen wiper is good for making lock picks. He’s a juggler with a circus school, so he may have a legitimate need to pick locks (when the escapologist can’t?)

When it comes to being environmentally aware and saving resources, we have to learn a list of words beginning with ‘r’ to add’ to the existing green lexicon – recycling, re-using, refusing, reducing.

Two relatively new kids on the block are ‘re-purposing’ and ‘upcycling’. Like the mis-use of ‘recycling’, the two are often used interchangeably. For pedants like me, try this from Mike – co-founder of reCreate Design Co in Sweden; she writes…

“Upcycle, in very simple terms, is taking something and making it better. It’s the reuse of an item that will still be used in the same way – but it looks new and improved. Upcycling can be achieved through paint, add-ons, new upholstery, etc. Repurpose, quite simply, is taking one thing and reusing [or re-creating?] it as something else. “

document-holder-hackThen there’s ‘hack’ by which I don’t mean listening in to  phone messages and e-mails. In this context, a ‘hack’ is a clever solution to a potentially tricky problem. To hack is to modify, or apply an unintended use for, something in a creative way. For me the key element of a hack is the ingenuity brought to practical problem-solving (even if that’s making something you need when you can’t afford to buy). My current favourite hack is to use a retailer’s plastic trouser hanger as a document holder.

All this is a long-winded way of announcing my plan to share my passion for re-purposing through highlighting some examples (some my own, some from others) from time to time on this blogsite.

The first in the series – coming soon – will be a Soap Sock. Feel free to share your own favourite re-purposing and hacking by replying to this blog.

Further reading: 

Recreate Design Co  http://recreatedesigncompany.com

Words to cut waste https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2014/03/31/words-to-cut-waste

The forgotten ‘r’  https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2014/01/20/the-forgotten-r-reduce-reuse-recycle-and-repair

Soap Sock https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2017/01/02/green-and-grey-repurpose-soap-sock 

Green and Grey – A Christmas Gift Guide

green-grey-logoThis is a shameless plug for the work of some of the wonderful people I met at the Festival of Thrift in Redcar back in September. We share a passion for taking reclaimed materials – other people’s waste – and turning them into festival-of-thrift-logostylish, quality products. Some are functional, some are artful, all are crafted with care for the environment and recognise the charm of the old (green and grey … geddit?) Thoughtful gifts created by makers who know the true meaning of value.


Purepallets founder and son http://www.remadeinbritain.com/purepallets/ with a small selection of there lovely stuff

Purepallets founder and son http://www.remadeinbritain.com/purepallets/ with a small selection of their lovely stuff

101 uses for an old washing machine drum from www.upcycled-cumbria.co.uk/

101 uses for an old washing machine drum from www.upcycled-cumbria.co.uk/

 

 

Upcycled cycle parts -discover your inner tube with www.veloculture.co.uk

Upcycling -discover your inner tube with www.veloculture.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you a budding Seasick Steve? Diddley Bros can help www.diddleybros.co.uk

Are you a budding Seasick Steve? Diddley Bros can help www.diddleybros.co.uk

 

 

 

 

A sunny serenade from Mr Spatchcock (or was it Mr Wurzill?) www.spatchcockand wurzill.com

A sunny serenade from Mr Spatchcock (or is that Mr Wurzill?) www.spatchcockandwurzill.com

 

 

Ten green bottles (with candles) from www.upcycleupnorth.co.uk

Ten green bottles (with candles) from www.upcycleupnorth.co.uk

 

Small really is beautiful when you're a Beady Magpie www.beadymagpie.wordpress.com/

Small really is beautiful when you’re a Beady Magpie www.beadymagpie.wordpress.com/

Brilliant birdfeeders from BerryBootique https://www.facebook.com/BerryBootique/

Brilliant birdfeeders from Berry Bootique https://www.facebook.com/BerryBootique/

Drinks cans to artworks by Sarah Turner http://sarahturner.co.uk/

Drinks cans to artworks by Sarah Turner I like the can-do attitude! http://sarahturner.co.uk/

 

 

 

 

 

 

A balanced approach to wine drinking with www.gwkwoodshed.org.uk

A balanced approach to wine drinking with www.gwkwoodshed.org.uk

 

 

See you at the Festival of Thrift in 2017? www.festivalofthrift.co.uk

See you at the Festival of Thrift in 2017? www.festivalofthrift.co.uk

From tabletop to laptop – Recover

Latest in the More Expert by Experience series. For other profiles, see http://bit.ly/1rd75hZ

Recover logoWhen I last spoke to Ian Block about his business plan, he’d three years to achieve self-funding from sales of quality upcycled pre-loved furniture. At that time (February 2014) Recover – the social enterprise he leads in Welwyn Garden City – was one year old. I wondered how the three year plan had progressed over the previous two years.

“Our mission has remained the same throughout” confirms Ian “It’s about helping people reintegrate and get themselves worthwhile employment that will stay with them, and help them to be the best they can be; that they feel fulfilled and their lives are worthwhile.”

I asked whether there had been any surprises – good or bad. Continuing the theme of benefiting the volunteers, Ian points to success at the rate at which people have gained and used new skills. Recover has helped raise expectations to the stage where, says Ian, most volunteers are keen to progress.

Looking back, Recover have learnt some hard lessons about the reality of working with people who are furthest from the jobs market. One lesson is a well-known ‘problem of success’ for many social enterprises – that the most capable and productive unemployed volunteers move to paid jobs – an occupational hazard! And for those that remain…

Recover people and products

“There are a broader range of issues facing our volunteers than we anticipated. Their lives are complicated and it takes more time and support for people to move on and stay moved on, particularly when they are older or have lower self-esteem.”

“We thought that the majority of volunteers would progress relatively quickly and then help run Recover. But once out of treatment, when they come to us, the original problems may resurface; they need a lot of hand-holding to develop a sense of self-worth.”   

The first step, of what is often a long journey, is turning up on a regular basis – establishing some structure and routine. Recover offers work and life skills development through refurbishing quality, high-end furniture and Ian doesn’t underestimate the challenge.

“We’re not making sandwiches here – the work takes skill, concentration, focus, practice creativity, Recover recoveringtechnique. We’ve developed methods, systems and processes to keep it as simple as possible, but it still takes a lot of time to teach and embed the learning.”

The intensity of the hands-on support for volunteers means that Ian is finding it harder to balance the books from sales than he’d anticipated. Recover is currently aiming for 50% of income from sales and 50% from funding.

The biggest single development over the past 12 months has been the transition to independence from Recover’s parent charity. Recover is now a Company Limited by Guarantee and Registered Charity in its own right. This means more paperwork as back office functions are taken in-house, including insurance, funding applications, and reporting to the new directors.

Despite the increased demands on his time, Ian is clear about what matters “My priorities are supporting our team and making money. The backroom work has to be fitted in around that. Reporting alone could become a fulltime job if you let it – I started out working on dining tables, now I spend a lot of time on computerised tables!”

Looking ahead, it’s about finding the right balance between growth and consolidation. For Ian the books must balance to keep the doors open. Recover aspires to raise their 50:50 funding/earning ratio to 100% income from trading, but wisely he doesn’t set a date for this.

In the meantime, Recover are getting to grips with pricing – an issue for many social enterprises and an area where Ian is learning fast ‘what works’.

                                                                     Ian gets hands on

“We’re educating people about value – the quality and cost of our work. We’ve been  able to reduce prices as we’ve got better  and faster at refurbishment. The pieces   that we turn into ‘artisan one-of- kind items’ are well-priced compared with mass produced generic flat pack furniture from economy high street chain stores. Items     we don’t refurbish are sold at considerably lower prices than charity shops. Sometimes, we just ask people on low income for a donation that suits their budget.”

Another ‘problem of success’ – in addition to losing the most capable volunteers – relates to Recover’s high profile (“done without any paid advertising” adds Ian proudly).  The two staff members are finding increased demands on their time – from media people, businesses (all support welcome!) and statutory sector staff.

A timely reminder that I’ve taken over an hour of Ian’s time. As I leave, he joins his team for lunch which, he tells me, will be a main meal of the day for some. Yes – two years on from our original meeting, the strengths and values of Recover are still very much in evidence.

 Further information and contact:

http://www.recoverteam.co.uk https://www.facebook.com/recoverteam.co.uk https://twitter.com/RecoverTeam

https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2014/02/19/the-art-of-adding-value (February 2014)

 

 

Purepallets – more than a family affair

Latest in the More Expert by Experience series

Purepallets 2 photosIn February 2015, Dawn Taylor – founder of Purepallets – was enjoying a service break from her visual merchandising role with a major high street store. After falling into a possible career change, Dawn wanted to see if she could make a business out of upcycling wooden pallets into unique products for homes and gardens.

A year later I was intrigued to find out whether, after the gestation period, she had cut the umbilical cord or returned to her more secure and financially rewarding role in mainstream retailing.

“I handed in my notice at the end of October” says Dawn. “I’m now self-employed and it’s quite scary. But I knew that if I survived the first 9 months it would be OK. So far, so good.”

Like many other entrepreneurs, Dawn enjoys the flexibility of being self-employed and working from home. She can combine home life with work in her workshop, help her son before and after school and, if she doesn’t think she’s put in enough hours, paint her pallet products in the evening.

“It’s a lot of hours if I include time on social media, but some days I might only work in the evening. And it doesn’t feel like work; I get up in the morning and I never have that feeling I used to get – ‘oh no, another day at work’. I’ve always got a new product to make so yes, I’m loving it.”

But can she keep work and home-life separated when she has a kitchen that doubles as a paint-shop, and what about weekends?

Family means I try to keep weekends free, but in the run up to Christmas I was very busy, so… But I do make a conscious effort not to work weekends. I’m in control – I can always say ‘no’, although a lot of the time I don’t!” Clearly Dawn is addicted to pallets in the nicest possible way.

Young Purepallet customersAttending events at weekends can be very time-consuming and is not always rewarding; Dawn is learning which ones are worth the effort. She points out that face-to-face contact with would-be customers personalises the business, which is the selling point of her bespoke creations – they’re individually made for individual people. And then there’s the reaction when people see her pallet products. “It gives people ideas, sparks their imagination, and I usually get commissions off the back of an event”. Over the past 12 months, commissions have continued to grow, through word-of-mouth and Facebook, to a point where they’re now up to 80% of sales income.

You’d think that the success of Purepallets would be enough to convince Dawn that she has a winning formula. But, like a mother nervously waiting for her child’s school report, she says she’s always anxious when she hands over a commissioned item. “Everything still feels so new that when I make a new item for someone and come to deliver it, I’m nervous they won’t like it. But then they say ‘it’s just what I wanted’ and that puts my mind at rest.” 

Purepallets is not so much a family business as a business that’s part of the family. Dawn’s pallet-dismantling husband and young son are, she says, ‘supportive’ and even the family’s small car doesn’t complain about doubling up as a van.

So how is the new member of the family settling in?  Like a rapidly growing teenager, it thinks in might be time to leave home! From sales at local events in and around York a year ago with mixed success, Purepallets products can now be found in retails outlets in Selby, Darlington, Halifax and, until recently, Wetherby.

Alongside possible re-location to an off-site workshop, storage space and retail outlet, what does 2016 have in store for Purepallets?

The list of events at which Dawn plans to display her products in the next 12 months sounds both impressive and exhausting. April means Living North exhibitions at Newcastle and York Racecourses. A return to the Festival of Thift in Darlington in September follows a successful visit in 2015 with Remade in Britain, and the York Christmas Markets will mean more pressure on precious weekends.

I finish our conversation delighted that Dawn loves pallets as much as she did when I first interviewed her in 2015 – on Valentine’s Day.

Further information:

Purepallets  http://on.fb.me/1ZLc701

Remade in Britain http://www.remadeinbritain.com/purepallets

A passion for pallets http://bit.ly/1QsPsVq  (February 2015)

Festival of Thrift 2016 http://www.festivalofthrift.co.uk

 

A passion for pallets

???????????????????????????????Creative flair, a willingness to roll up sleeves and ‘have a go’, to experiment and being prepared to fail, all make Dawn Taylor well suited to a recent, perhaps surprising, career development. Dawn is founder of York-based enterprise Purepallets which does what it says on the tin (or should that be timber?) turning pallets into crafted items fit to grace any home.

From wine racks and candle holders to what can only be described as ‘letter wall shelving’ (B anyone?) pallet product design and creation clearly excites Dawn.

But perhaps the new career move is not so surprising, as Dawn explains… “When I was young I was a tomboy. My dad was a plumber and built our extension by himself, and I helped him. I learnt how to mix cement and lay bricks, so from an early age I’ve not been scared to try new things.” 

So, practical from an early age and Dawn’s creativity – probably also rooted in her past – has been honed through a career in retailing, including 14 years as a visual merchandiser with a major UK high street store.

And what could be more creative than turning a much-maligned product – the humble pallet which many of Dawn’s friends think is only good for firewood – into a thing with real appeal, each one unique? Having “fallen into making pallet products by accident” – an unexpected commission to make a wine rack – Dawn was soon bitten by the upcycling bug. She has just started experimenting with paint effects but still delights in the beauty of the ‘pure pallet’ finish which, when embossed with the original owners logo adds to the story behind the product.

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Now taking a service break with her current employer, Dawn has nine months to see if she can ‘give birth’ to a financially viable business. The product range is developing nicely – mainly through commissions from a rapidly widening customer base that values the bespoke nature of each item. With low overheads to date – pallets are sourced locally at low/no cost, the workshop is a garage at home, social media and word-of-mouth are the main marketing tools – there may be a temptation to under-value the finished product.

But Dawn believes her promotional offer – quality and uniqueness at affordable prices – could create a sustainable business model. While pallets grow on trees (well, sort of…) Dawn’s talents do not. With these she may just be able to differentiate Purepallets’ product range from others and have champagne corks popping.

See Purepallets products at http://on.fb.me/1xtfc8T