Tag Archives: value

Green and Grey – A Christmas Gift Guide

green-grey-logoThis is a shameless plug for the work of some of the wonderful people I met at the Festival of Thrift in Redcar back in September. We share a passion for taking reclaimed materials – other people’s waste – and turning them into festival-of-thrift-logostylish, quality products. Some are functional, some are artful, all are crafted with care for the environment and recognise the charm of the old (green and grey … geddit?) Thoughtful gifts created by makers who know the true meaning of value.


Purepallets founder and son http://www.remadeinbritain.com/purepallets/ with a small selection of there lovely stuff

Purepallets founder and son http://www.remadeinbritain.com/purepallets/ with a small selection of their lovely stuff

101 uses for an old washing machine drum from www.upcycled-cumbria.co.uk/

101 uses for an old washing machine drum from www.upcycled-cumbria.co.uk/

 

 

Upcycled cycle parts -discover your inner tube with www.veloculture.co.uk

Upcycling -discover your inner tube with www.veloculture.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you a budding Seasick Steve? Diddley Bros can help www.diddleybros.co.uk

Are you a budding Seasick Steve? Diddley Bros can help www.diddleybros.co.uk

 

 

 

 

A sunny serenade from Mr Spatchcock (or was it Mr Wurzill?) www.spatchcockand wurzill.com

A sunny serenade from Mr Spatchcock (or is that Mr Wurzill?) www.spatchcockandwurzill.com

 

 

Ten green bottles (with candles) from www.upcycleupnorth.co.uk

Ten green bottles (with candles) from www.upcycleupnorth.co.uk

 

Small really is beautiful when you're a Beady Magpie www.beadymagpie.wordpress.com/

Small really is beautiful when you’re a Beady Magpie www.beadymagpie.wordpress.com/

Brilliant birdfeeders from BerryBootique https://www.facebook.com/BerryBootique/

Brilliant birdfeeders from Berry Bootique https://www.facebook.com/BerryBootique/

Drinks cans to artworks by Sarah Turner http://sarahturner.co.uk/

Drinks cans to artworks by Sarah Turner I like the can-do attitude! http://sarahturner.co.uk/

 

 

 

 

 

 

A balanced approach to wine drinking with www.gwkwoodshed.org.uk

A balanced approach to wine drinking with www.gwkwoodshed.org.uk

 

 

See you at the Festival of Thrift in 2017? www.festivalofthrift.co.uk

See you at the Festival of Thrift in 2017? www.festivalofthrift.co.uk

Keeping the past alive

Guest blog from Kathy Wilson, Royston Repair Cafe volunteer

IMG_0051Sometimes items arriving for repair at the Royston Repair Café are from a bygone era. This was certainly the case on Sunday 24th April 2016, when Naomi Wallen brought her grandfather’s 50-year-old Ekco Transistor Radio, which didn’t seem to tune into any modern radio stations.

Naomi fondly remembers the radio always on whenever she visited her grandfather’s house as a child, and expressed how lovely it would be to have it working again.

The volunteer repairers were clearly excited with the prospect of taking apart something so old and doing their best to get it working again. Because there are usually lots of owners bringing in broken goods, normally only one volunteer repairer can look at each item. But this was special, so next thing at least three repairers were eagerly bent over the partially dismantled radio, all giving their views on what the problem could be.

IMG_0050Most of the volunteers remember happily taking apart and putting back together all manner of items when they were young, which gave them a good grounding in ‘how things work’. After approximately 90 minutes, they managed to fix the radio to the point of picking up stations, but not completely clearly. They realised it was a matter of replacing one part, and the radio would work fully again!

There’s definitely a sense of satisfaction in repairing something, or at least attempting to do so. It’s not just that repairers feel a sense of personal satisfaction, but having fixed something, we feel we’re helping, in our little way, to overcome manufacturer planned-obsolescence and the concept of the ‘throw-away society’. And in the case of the transistor radio, we’ve given Naomi new memories to make.

Radio Fix success

Get updates on the Royston Repair Café at www.facebook.com/roystonrepaircafe 

Value, cost and price

Tractor-For-Sale-Tinsign“Pricing based on cost makes no sense whatsoever. Cost isn’t abstract, but value is.”  Seth Godin

My Dad’s family business – the only company in the world to make hand-embroidered tapestries for the international market – liquidated around 1970. It was just about the time I might have gone into the family firm but for my father the closure was a relief; as Financial Director he’d foreseen the beginning of the end – the Equal Pay Act – a number of years earlier.

The tapestries were high quality and hand-crafted and, even before equal pay, labour costs were high. The women weavers and embroiderers, 90% of the workforce, were highly trained and the work was labour-intensive. The tapestries had to sell for increasingly high prices and people preferred to spend their money on fast cars and big houses.

And when people did buy these works of art, I remember my Dad saying “they’re more interested in telling their friends how much they paid for the tapestry than valuing the quality of the work”.

Fast-forward 45 years and I haven’t a clue about the true value of even the most basic commodity – milk. I pay twice as much for a pint at my local shop compared with our edge-of-town supermarket. I may be stupid but I’d prefer to support the shop at the end of my road while it’s still there (and while I can afford to) rather than line the coffers of the superstore with a strap-line that says ‘very little helps’ …or something like that.

And what about books? I spent 15 years in publishing and left the industry just as the Net Book Agreement – which set a book’s price across all outlets – was withdrawn. Now the price of a book seems to have no relation to its length or format. Nor, of course, does price relate to the thing we value most – the quality of the contents. The industry now seems to treat books as just another commodity, priced at what the market (that’s you and me) will bear.

Personally, I don’t see books as a commodity, but then maybe I’m out of step with current trends (I’ve shunned an e-reader in favour of ‘the real thing’ and will do so as long as my eyesight and bookshelf space allows). And it also matters to me that my online book-buying supports high street bookshops, so I use www.hive.co.uk.

With the explosion of £ shops (I’ve even seen a 95p store), Black Friday, all-year-round sales, and 2-for-1 meal deals, I don’t know what I should be paying for even the most basic items, not just milk and books. But I like the idea of restaurants inviting diners to pay what they think their meal is worth…

Until I get too old to make my own decisions, I aim to pay a fair price for what I value – stuff that’s good quality, where possible is locally-sourced and ethically-produced, and that doesn’t screw someone in the supply chain.

This is not easy, I know. But most of us can choose how and where we spend our money. Maybe we should spend more time doing so?

For an interesting insight into the buying process, go to http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2014/02/most-of-all-money-is-a-story.html

A useful and all-embracing list of pricing strategies is at http://bit.ly/1moB0lR

 

Drown your puppies

no-dogs-allowedIf you’re familiar with the Boston Matrix (a marketing tool not a Hollywood blockbuster) you’ll also probably know the term ‘dogs’. These are activities that are not making money nor contributing to the mission of the organisation being assessed.

If you identify any ‘dogs’ in your organisation the advice is to drop this activity or, as some put it more provocatively, ‘drown your puppies’.

The beauty of this particular phrase is that it grabs the reader’s attention (whether or not you’re a puppy-lover) and it also encapsulates the truth that organisations often have pet projects that are kept alive, often by the people who created them, for emotional reasons. Blind to evidence that an activity has become a waste of time and money (it may always have been so) charities are probably more guilty than the average for-profit business of getting their head and heart balance wrong. Smaller charities are particularly good at ‘flogging dead horses’ (another brutal animal image!)

For social enterprises – businesses with a social purpose – success is often defined as achieving the ‘triple bottom line’ of social, financial and environmental objectives. This makes the identification of ‘dogs’ more difficult because the activity may be justified for non-financial reasons. At the Repair Shed in Hemel Hempstead, where men aged 50+ come together to stay healthier and happier for longer through making, mending and learning, we’re dealing with ‘pet project issues’ of a different kind.

As readers of a recent blog may remember, the making part of Repair Shed members’ activity has to date largely involved using reclaimed timber to make products for homes and gardens. I think some of us have surprised ourselves with the quality of the work we’ve turned out – I know I have – pleased with the result and… reluctant to see it offered for sale.

Objectively, the Repair Shed should be trying to sell as many products as possible – to make money, create more storage space, and to save more timber from becoming waste. Subjectively however, perhaps we’re worried others might not be as proud to own the products as we were to make them. So there are mixed feelings when a project that people have been working on is sold – because making it again will never generate the same sense of achievement. The silver lining is that if your creation remains unsold, you can always take it home and show if off to friends and family who will appreciate it (or say they do).

It must be the same when starting out on any creative journey. In retirement, my friend Carl has taken up painting. This year he bravely submitted two pieces to our annual art exhibition and put a £60 price tag on each of them. Much to his surprise he sold one of them but, excited though he was, he couldn’t disguise his relief that the ‘right’ painting (ie the one in which he’d invested less time) had been bought.

It’s a tough lesson – if you want to succeed in a creative business you must be prepared to let go of your best work and risk it being under-valued.

A related blog – The paying customer is always right – is at https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2015/11/25/the-paying-customer-is-always-right

More on the Boston Matrix at http://www.oxlearn.com/arg_Marketing-Resources-The-Boston-Matrix_11_35

Time Trials # 1 – precious time

HourglassImagine a bank that credits your account each morning with £86,400. It carries over no balance from day to day. Every evening the bank deletes whatever part of the balance you failed to use during the day.

What would you do? Draw out all of it of course!

Each of us has such a bank – its name is TIME.

Every morning, it credits you with 86,400 seconds. Every night it writes off as lost, whatever of this you have failed to invest to a good purpose.

It carries over no balance. It allows no overdraft. Each day it opens a new account for you.

Each night it burns the remains of the day. If you fail to use the day’s deposits, the loss is yours.

There is no drawing against ‘tomorrow’. You must live in the present on today’s deposits.

Invest it so as to get from it the utmost in health, happiness and success.

The clock is running. Make the most of today.
To realise the value of ONE YEAR, ask a student who failed a grade.

To realise the value of ONE MONTH, ask a mother who has given birth to a premature baby.

To realise the value of ONE WEEK, ask the editor of a weekly newspaper.

To realise the value of ONE HOUR, ask the lovers who are waiting to meet.

To realise the value of ONE MINUTE, ask a person who just missed a train.

To realise the value of ONE SECOND, ask someone who just avoided an accident.

To realise the value of ONE MILLISECOND, ask the person who won a silver medal at the Olympics.

Source unknown

Coming soon – Time  Trials #2

Enterprise Essential – See price from the buyer’s point of view

The relationship between price and perceived quality is not a straight forward one. A high quality item sold at a high price can confer status while the same item sold at a low price is a super-bargain. Both purchases are something customers might tell their friends about! Even terminology can make a difference; describing something as ‘affordable’ ‘or ‘good value’ can create a different impression from describing it as ‘cheap’.

 

Enterprise essential – Fair pricing can raise expectations and standards

Deciding whether to pay £100 for a training course encourages some associated questions. What does £100 of learning look like? How will I know if I’ve got value for money? How else might I spend that £100 for equal value to the individual/ enterprise? How will I ensure my £100 investment in training turns into an asset after the course?