Tag Archives: words

Lazy language

Regular readers of these blog posts will know I have a series of ‘red rag words’ that get my goat. (You’ll also know I like alliteration). Just three are ‘engage’, ‘deliver’ and ‘disrupt’ (as related to business innovation).

I think what I dislike about current use of these words is that, more often than not, they’re lazy language; used so vaguely as to be meaningless. ‘We will engage with the community’We will deliver Brexit’We’re in the business of disruption’– but how, why and when? Just saying it doesn’t commit anyone to anything. Lovers get engaged, letters are delivered – although both increasingly rarely – while train delays increasingly disrupt people’s lives.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m delighted if one word can take the place of three and when a single word used in the right context needs no further explanation – that’s the beauty of our language well-used.

I’m now fast developing a collection of red rag phrases – ‘agile working’ (see my blog on the subject), ‘fit for purpose’, and ‘blended learning’ are three recent additions to the list. I think people use phrases like this because they trip off the tongue (there goes that alliteration again) and they sound positive and definite. In reality, they don’t have any consequences for the speaker or writer so they’re safe to spout.

Say what you mean and mean what you say’ is sound advice. Yes – language has to evolve, yes – grammatical rules are there to be broken, but clear communication is too important for words to be carelessly used and abused by lazy linguists.

Further rants…

On agile working https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/2018/04/02/is-agile-working-the-answer

For other blog posts in this ‘communications matters’ series, go to https://enterpriseessentials.wordpress.com/category/communication-matters

 

Learning about Earning: lessons 3 and 4 from a social enterprise start-up

Project plan vs business plan

“Never present figures without a story, never tell a story without figures”

What’s the balance of words and figures in your plan (assuming you’re setting up or running a social enterprise)? Despite the pressure from all around to ‘be more business-like’ in my experience, charities are still good with words rather than figures, whereas organisations down the earning end of the ‘asking-earning’ spectrum use figures to tell their story (with the narrative in the background).

In my twelve months as a social enterprise start-up, I’ve had a business plan sitting on a shelf (almost complete, but weak on figures..!) and I revise my project plan every time I bid for grant support (three times – fingers crossed for third time lucky…) In all three cases, the application has been strong on words but, until the third application (when I got help) I’ve been weak on hard evidence in the form of figures (about scale of need, benefit and income) to make the business case.

If you want help to make the mental and physical – it’s as much about thoughts as actions – journey from asking to earning, try this http://bit.ly/1qFGGoJ

Planning vs doing

Cliche alert: ‘Fail to plan and you plan to fail’ andPiss Poor Planning Promotes Piss Poor Performance’ are over-used clichés that are a good excuse for not taking the plunge – talking about doing rather than doing.

Waiting to get all the jigsaw pieces in place and building firm foundations sounds like common sense, but what about (analogy alert) jumping in to test the water without having all your ducks in a row?  A ‘lean start-up’ can…

Motivate:  Having general discomfort can encourage us to go further, faster (you will run faster when chased by someone with a knife…)

Enable real market research: By launching the unfinished article in which you’ve invested relatively less cash and care, you’re more likely to respond to criticisms positively and adapt your product – which is what innovation is all about.

Reduce padding, increase focus: Without the luxury of unlimited resources, the new enterprise is forced to hone in on essential spending with a keen focus on purpose

Attract finance:  A shining business plan with figures to impress is just that – a plan and a promise – whereas hard evidence – of demand for new real products and services – counts for a lot.

More on the case for a lean start-up at http://bit.ly/1kjOsoT

 If you’re interested in exploring ways to turn ideas into action, join Chris Lee for a day-long workshop on December 4 in Chelmsford Details at www.voluntarysectortraining.org.uk/courses/event/70/Ideas-Into-Action

Enterprise essential – Free, new and you

‘Trigger words’ that, used in your written materials, will attract attention and generate interest. Use ‘free’ and ‘new’ with care – not too often and only when what you are offering is genuinely new and/or free! In comparison, you should use ‘you’ and ‘your’ as often as you can (and much more than ‘we’ and ‘our’). It may seen unnatural, but it will give your writing a chatty style and draws in your readers.